Tips for Hardy Gardeners

Gardening tips for Duluth's Northern climate, hosted by Master Gardener Tom Kasper.

©Lisa Johnson

Master gardener Tom Kasper is excited about all the new fruit trees folks are planting to replace trees downed in summer storms.

But the problem is, rabbits, mice and deer are excited about them, too.

Lisa Johnson

Master Gardener Tom Kasper says now is the time to divide perennials - like peonies - and maybe even organize a swap with your friends.

F. D. Richards [via Flickr]

  The soggy ground continues to bring the threat of black molds and powdery mildew, and gardeners need to be mindful of what flowers and plants to prune, and what to keep and possibly treat to prevent the return of these fungi next spring.

Despite the soggy ground, now is the time to divide perennials - irises and peonies, for example - to best prepare them for next year.  Dividing can help underperforming flowers to produce more and better blooms in  the coming seasons.

Scot Nelson/Jamie Komata/Flickr

It's true: the warm weather, abundant rains and sunshine have produced bumper crops of just about everything - including black mold and powdery mildew.

Sharon Mollerus [via Flickr]

Weeds are smarter than we think they are, says Tom Kasper. They blend in with surrounding vegetation and grow very fast. 

In the warm and often drier month of August, Tom reminds us to keep our gardens watered and weeded. Fruits and vegetables are starting to ripen, so keeping them fed and free of competition will help ensure they finish the summer healthy.  Stay vigilant.

Lisa Johnson

Every year, master gardener Tom Kasper carefully tips the roses at the Rose Garden to protect them through the winter.

But trees aren't rosebushes, and trying to tip storm-uprooted silver maples and spruces back into place is a recipe for disaster.

Also: when it comes time to replant trees, Tom has some ideas for replacements with sturdy root systems.

Tom Kasper is pretty excited about some of the new easy care roses, including the two pictured here: The Winnipeg Parks rose and the Como Park rose.

Bill Dickinson/Flickr

You know how, a couple of times a year, school (sometimes the whole city) shuts down and everyone is told to stay home for a snow day?

Tom Kasper, a regular feature host on Northland Morning (called "an epicenter of social change") says he could absolutely get behind the idea of everything shutting down and being told to stay home on a sunny, 75 degree day - to garden.

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