Tips for Hardy Gardeners

Gardening tips for Duluth's Northern climate, hosted by Master Gardener Tom Kasper.

Swallowtail Garden Seeds [via Flickr]

First: Water (Check! Plenty of rain lately). Second: Light (Yes, we've also had some good sun).

MN Reads: Savory Sweet

Jun 28, 2018
University of Minnesota Press and Mette Nielsen

What do you do with another pile of beets form your CSA?

We regularly weed and water our vegetable and flower gardens, and today Tom Kasper reminds us to also feed our plants, on a regular schedule.  Plant food is fertilizer, which you can find for sale, or in your own backyard compost pile.  Good options over commercial chemical fertilizers which give you an organic harvest include compost and fish and seaweed emulsions.  Listen for more tips on feeding your plants. 

©Bret Thiele/Duluth-Area Backyard Gardeners

Tom Kasper says the rain and warm temperatures mean weeds are exploding this year (metaphorically speaking), and there are several options to choose from when it comes to getting rid of them.

Alan Levine/Flickr

Tom Kasper says it's time to get that garden in, and like many undertakings, it's more fun with a friend.

Karen Roe/Flickr

Tom Kasper isn't a doctor, and he doesn't even play one on the radio.

But he is a master gardener.  And as we begin Mental Health Week on KUMD,  it turns out he knows a thing or two about how gardening can be good for what ails you.

©Emily Ford. Used with permission.

Emily Ford isn't the kind of gardener to sit around twiddling her thumbs when winter drags on.

The harsh winter took her bees, but she's already planning to restock the hives. And while she was waiting for spring to arrive, she tapped some friends to borrow gear and then tapped some maple trees.

Suffice it to say that this year, Glensheen will be abuzz with bees, in bloom with roses, and dripping with maple syrup.

Internet Archive Book Image/Flickr

If you're already bored gently raking up the soggy leaves and snow mold from your yard, Tom Kasper says it's the perfect time to divide things like rhubarb or hostas - and you certainly don't need a delicate touch.

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