Tips for Hardy Gardeners

Gardening tips for Duluth's Northern climate, hosted by Master Gardener Tom Kasper.

Tom Kasper

Tom Kasper is wondering where he can get some snow.

"February 20th and my bee balm is sprouting," he writes on his Facebook page.  "I'm all for an early spring. But this is a little too early!"

Perhaps the immortal words of Simon and Garfunkel are what our perennials need about now:

Slow down; you move too fast

You've got to make the winter last ...!

Tom Kasper

Tom Kasper is ignoring the -20 to -30 below windchills of the next few days, and the melting mid-30s after that in favor of  his plant and seed catalogs, where lawns are green,  gardens are lush and all the dahlias are above average.

Steve Johnson [via Flickr, modified]

Tom Kasper reminds us in these winter months to be mindful of where we direct our slowblower jetsam. Especially with icy or heavy snow, branches can be easily damaged. 

Even after all these years, all the cool gadgets he's talked about on the show, a decades-long quest for an electric wheelbarrow ... master gardener Tom Kasper says there's still nothing better than giving the gift of your time to garden with someone you love.

Lisa Johnson

Tom Kasper says you can still get out and do your winter pruning without danger of insects or disease affecting your trees or bushes ... don't forget the tree wrap against rabbits, deer and sun scald ... and spring  bulbs are really, really cheap!

Tom Kasper

Larry Weber likes to talk about the magical time of what he calls aut-win: the time between the leaf drop and the first snowfall.

And Tom Kasper says, while you're in your yard, taking time to smell the roses anyway (that's his shrub rose in bloom last Friday, November 11), you might as well take advantage of the good visibility to finish lopping storm-damaged branches off your trees.

www.homejobsbymom.com/Flickr

Master gardener Tom Kasper draws some flack for not being on top of the national pumpkin conversations this week.

Adam Koford/Flickr

In the Autumn a young gardener's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of rose-tipping, planting spring bulbs and garlic.

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