Northland Morning Interviews

Daily interviews with a local focus airing at 8 a.m. Monday through Friday on Northland Morning.

This Week on Northland Morning

Potter Sharon Moen was planning on being the next Rachel Carlson when she was pursuing her undergraduate degree in ornithology.  Then she took that one credit art class .....

Natalija Walbridge lives right near her inspiration: the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge.  But she sees a lot more than a bridge when she looks at it, and that's reflected in her designs.

Kelly Beaster is making her first appearance at the Park Point Art Fair this year.   She talks about her unconventional approach to drawing (ball point pen!) and how she knows when a work is finished.   You can read about Kelly Beaster and see more of her work here:

Our week-long showcase of artists at this year's Park Point Art Fair kicks off with award-winning glass artist Douglas Becker.  He talks about how quickly you can learn what not to do when dealing with hot glass ... and how "trial-and-error" might better be called "trial-and-learn."

You can read more about Doug Becker and see more photos of his work here:

Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute

Wisconsin has almost doubled its loon population in the last thirty years.  It's good news, not only for those who love the haunting call of these bird, but because loons need clean, clear, healthy lakes in which to live and raise their families.

Now LoonWatch is looking for volunteers/citizen-scientists to help them collect loon population data.  LoonWatch coordinator Erica LeMoine explains.

Transguyjay/Flickr

Doug Luthanen grew up in Ely, the town "at the end of the road."

He says that isolation, combined with a different kind of mining than that in the rest of the Range, created a unique culture of mines, miners and regular folks.

Eating local is a snap during the summer here in the Northland ... but for most of the months of the year, it's close to impossible unless you've socked away a lot of local produce.

Healthy Duluth/ Bryan French

Duluth bicyclists are proud of how bike-friendly the city has become.

So it's no surprise that when the most recent draft of the redesigned Superior Street was scheduled to be unveiled (next Tuesday, June 23), there was concern that the plan didn't include bike lanes.

Shawna MullenEardley of the Healthy Duluth Coalition says they drafted a letter of support asking for a “'Complete Street' design, including parallel parking, comfortable pedestrian spaces, convenient transit stops, and protected bike lanes" and it's getting a lot of, well ... support:

We wrap up our series "The Congdon Legacy" on Northland Morning on Chester Congdon’s Birthday, born on this day  in 1853.  In honor of the original intention and highlights of design at Glensheen, the current Director at Glensheen shares what he sees could be done to return the estate back to its former glory 100 years ago.

Glensheen Estate

The Congdon Legacy includes community leadership and family drama, but is also carries the history of luxury in 1910.  Chester and Clara traveled extensively, enjoying life in the western US and here in Duluth, MN.  Chester even traveled by ship to New Zealand, Indonesia, China and back with his buddies.  With the Glensheen mansion right on the water edge in Duluth, Lake Superior was a big part of family life and they had a large boathouse, a breakwater pier and of course they had a yacht. 

Glensheen

When you visit Glensheen: The Historic Congdon Estate you get a glimpse into the past, of life at the turn of the last century.  But this is not just a time-capsule museum, this is a place of family history, of lives lived and a community history that lives on through the estate.

Elizabeth Congdon’s life on the shore of Lake Superior, how she lived and who she was - as a Duluthian, a mother, a grandmother and the last Congdon resident at Glensheen, has long been overshadowed by her untimely death in 1977. 

WILLIAM A. DYCHE

 You may know the Congdon name from Glensheen: The Historic Congdon Estate on Lake Superior in Duluth. It was the home of Chester Congdon and his family, but he was not your typical Duluth tycoon.

Wildwoods Rehabilitation

If Laura Erickson has taught us anything over the last almost-thirty years, it's that animals think - and act - like animals, not humans.  So when we see the baby fawn all alone or the little bird out of it's nest, our human oh-my-gosh-it's-an-infant-alone-in-the-woods instinct kicks in and we rush to help.  

Kaiti Titherington/USFWS

There was supposed to be a romance down on Park Point.  It was touted as the kind of love story that's not been seen in these parts for over 30 years, and the St. Louis River Alliance wanted the public to steer clear for a while and give the couple some space.

But it was a case of mistaken identity.

Pages