Native American Heritage Month 2016

November is Native American Heritage Month and all month KUMD will spotlight programming that respectfully shares the culture and traditions of indigenous peoples in America.

KUMD programming honoring Native American Heritage Month includes our regular year-round segments and programs plus additional interviews and specials. Listen Mondays and throughout the month for Minnesota Native News, Veterans Voices ~ Native Warriors, National Native News, Ojibwe Stories and more. Tune in for Native American Heritage Month on KUMD. 

Water Protectors at Standing Rock
Credit Rob Wilson Photography

Year-Round Native Programming on KUMD

Additional Native American Programming

Sacred Stone Camp
Every Native Vote Counts
#Native Reads for kids
Rob Wilson Photography at Standing Rock

KUMD is a part of Ampers; The Association of Minnesota Public and Educational Radio Stations, a cooperative organization connecting independent public, educational and tribal radio stations across Minnesota. Through Ampers, KUMD partners with Northern Minnesota Tribal stations KBFT on the Boise Forte Reservation on Nett Lake, KKWE at White Earth Indian Reservation near Detroit Lakes and KOJB The Eagle of the Leech Lake Reservation south of Bemidji.

Photo 1: Mathers Museum of World Cultures/Flickr
Cheyenne woman Jennie Red Robe with her child.
 Location: Crow Reservation, Montana
Date: 1909
Photo 2: John Tewell
A black family at the Hermitage Plantation, Savannah, Georgia, USA, about 1907
Photo 3: Marion Doss/Flickr
Prisoners in the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen, Germany, December 19, 1938.

 

Photo courtesy Michelle Johnson-Jennings

Through this series, Journey to Wellness in Indian Country, we have focused on various aspects of what has contributed to the health disparities that American Indians face and the culturally-rooted solutions being implemented in tribes across Minnesota and beyond.

Dr.  Michelle Johnson-Jennings says tribal people have had the secret to healthy living all along: the ancestors gave instructions for healthy, happy living in the stories that have been passed down through the generations.

Heidi Ehalt

Through this series, Journey to Wellness in Indian Country, we have focused on various aspects of what has contributed to the health disparities that American Indians face and the culturally-rooted solutions being implemented in tribes across Minnesota and beyond.

   Today we are talking about food. Our guest, The Sioux Chef, Sean Sherman, is one of the most innovative and hottest up and coming chefs in the nation. He is at the head of a movement to introduce indigenous cuisine into modern dining.

Photo 1: Mathers Museum of World Cultures/Flickr
Crow Woman and Child, Location: Crow Reservation, Montana
Photo 2: elycefeliz/Flickr
Photo 3: Raymund Flandez/Flickr
A Jewish woman walks towards the gas chambers with three young children after going through the selection process on the ramp at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

  On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have another conversation with Leona Wakonabo and Gerri Howard.  They grew up on the Leech Lake Reservation and currently work at the Niigaane Immersion School in Leech Lake.  They are also one of the elders working for the Ojibwemotaadidaa Adult Immersion Program.  Our discussion is about immersion approaches to language education.

An important part of improving health and wellness in indigenous communities is research -- but how do you proceed when researchers have time and time again broken faith with the people they're professing to help?

©Derek Jennings

Many European Americans have a hard time understanding the concept of "historical trauma."

After all, if something happened decades or even hundreds of years ago, it's over; "move on," right?

The Australian Human Rights Commission explains historical trauma as  "the devastating trauma of genocide, loss of culture, and forcible removal from family and communities ... all unresolved and ... a sort of ‘psychological baggage... continuously being acted out and recreated..."

Center of American Indian and Minority Health

Native people in Minnesota die, on the average, ten years sooner than all other Minnesotans.

Part of that statistic comes from poverty and limited access to health care.

But the Center for American Indian and Minority Health at UMD is working the problem from both ends: recruiting Native students into careers in medicine so they can return to their communities and provide medical care.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

This episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa is part two of a conversation with Nancy Jones, a respected elder from Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation near Fort Frances, Ontario. She has worked for many years as a teacher and cultural advisor for schools and language revitalization programs in Ontario, Wisconsin and Minnesota. She shares life stories and talks about staying connected to the land, listening to the animals, finding and storing food, the medicine wheel, and the importance of being thankful. 

©Derek Jennings

Wellness is more than just an absence of disease.

It's physical and mental health, and as Native people are moving forward in their journey toward that health, they're doing so by looking backwards: back to the cultural and natural landscape that kept them well long before the time of frybread.

B A Bowen Photography (via Flickr)

  On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have a conversation with Nancy Jones, a respected elder from Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation near Fort Frances, Ontario.  She has worked for many years as a teacher and cultural advisor for schools and language revitalization programs in Ontario, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have a conversation with Leona Wakonabo and Gerri Howard.  They grew up on the Leech Lake Reservation and currently work at the Niigaane Immersion School in Leech Lake.  They are also one of the elders working for the Ojibwemotaadidaa Adult Immersion Program.  Our discussion is about the seasonal activities in their community when they were growing up, including fishing, making maple syrup, and looking for signs in nature.

Dr. Melissa Walls

When Mike Connor agreed to conduct some interviews with doctors, families and people who have diabetes in the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa, he knew the information he was helping to gather for the University of Minnesota Medical School Duluth was going to be important.

So many people on the reservation near Nett Lake have diabetes that it's one of the things ambulance drivers are required to ask about when they arrive to help someone.

But he didn't expect the "side effects" of the research: helping people with diabetes feel less isolated and alone.

For much of history, its accounts have been written by men - white men - for men.

So only one voice was heard and only part of the story was told.

In this history of the Red Lake Nation, commissioned by Red Lake band itself, author/historian/Ojibwe linguist Anton Treuer draws on material from the Red Lake archives, made available for the first time.

It's not only history from another voice, telling another part of the story - "We are much more than  the sum of our tragedies" says Treuer -  it's an entirely new way to think about the research and writing of history.

©Stacy Rasmus Photo used with the permission of Billy Charles and Lawrence Edmunds

The University of Minnesota is looking for nationally-recognized researchers and leaders in their field to head four teams focused on solving health issues important to Minnesota and the nation.

It plans to create four Medical Discovery teams, recruiting prominent researchers in four areas of medical discovery.

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