Native American Heritage Month 2016

November is Native American Heritage Month and all month KUMD will spotlight programming that respectfully shares the culture and traditions of indigenous peoples in America.

KUMD programming honoring Native American Heritage Month includes our regular year-round segments and programs plus additional interviews and specials. Listen Mondays and throughout the month for Minnesota Native News, Veterans Voices ~ Native Warriors, National Native News, Ojibwe Stories and more. Tune in for Native American Heritage Month on KUMD. 

Water Protectors at Standing Rock
Credit Rob Wilson Photography

Year-Round Native Programming on KUMD

Additional Native American Programming

Sacred Stone Camp
Every Native Vote Counts
#Native Reads for kids
Rob Wilson Photography at Standing Rock

KUMD is a part of Ampers; The Association of Minnesota Public and Educational Radio Stations, a cooperative organization connecting independent public, educational and tribal radio stations across Minnesota. Through Ampers, KUMD partners with Northern Minnesota Tribal stations KBFT on the Boise Forte Reservation on Nett Lake, KKWE at White Earth Indian Reservation near Detroit Lakes and KOJB The Eagle of the Leech Lake Reservation south of Bemidji.

National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC)

The folks at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center in Lame Deer, MT knew representatives from the movie Wind River would be coming to visit.

After all, they were shooting a new TV series, Yellowstone, nearby and had promised to help host a fundraiser.

If families are the building blocks of a community, it makes sense to provide them with support and connectedness to other families.

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

The boarding school era for Native American children in America began with the opening of the Carlisle School in 1879. It was considered a more "merciful" solution to what was then thought of as "the Indian problem." 

It continued until the passage of the Indian Child Welfare act in 1978, when Native parents finally gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.

On this Thanksgiving Day, Sioux (Oglala Lakota) chef Sean Sherman is being treated by his family.

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.

After their retirement from UMD, Tom and Betsy Peacock weren't the type of folks to kick back and do nothing.

They saw a need: for more children's books for Native kids and for Native authors and illustrators to have a way to get a foot in the door of the publishing world.

So they founded Black Bears & Blueberries Publishing.

Listen as Linda Legarde Grover introduces her new book, "Onigamiising Seasons of an Ojibwe Year" and talks about the significance. 

Onigamiising in Ojibwe translates to, "the place of the small portage," which refers to the strip of land separating the bay and harbor near Park Point. 

Linda had written small excerpts about seasons and met with editors to create this novel.

Center of American Indian & Minority Health

Christian Coffman can't stop beaming, just thinking about the student who came into his class this summer admitting that many of the sciences were not his favorite subjects.

Coffman, a grad student in Chemistry at UMD was teaching some STEM courses this summer as part of the Center of Minority and Indian Health's Native Americans in Medicine program.

Marcia Anderson's fascinating, gorgeously illustrated book of the art of the Ojibwe bandolier bag had its genesis in a box she opened in 1981.

Courtney Celley/USFWS.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have a conversation with Dennis Jones about the 

Ojibwe language, naming ceremonies, offering tobacco and more. Jones recently retired from years as an Ojibwe language instructor at the University of Minnesota. He is a band member of Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation, located in the Treaty Three territory in northwestern Ontario.  He is the author of Daga Anishinaabemodaa: Let's Speak Ojibwe, an Ojibwe Word List and Phrase Book, illustrated by Aza Erdrich.

Originally aired 11/21/16

A rare screening of local animation is showing 7pm on Thursday July, 20 at Teatro Zuccone.  A collection of films by local artist Jonathan Thunder is an exciting part of his new exhibit “Peripheral Vignettes” at the Duluth Art Institute.  

_paVan_ (via Flickr, modified)

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we welcome back Nancy Jones, a respected elder from Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation near Fort Frances, Ontario. 

Originally aired 9/15/2016

Radio Gallery: Play

Jun 20, 2017
Rob Atoms

The Duluth Art Institute is opening two summer exhibits on June 29, "Peripheral Vignettes" a solo show of Jonathan Thunder's paintings, and "Play" a group multi-media show about games. 

There is a new exhibit called Sinew at the Tweed Museum of Art bringing together the work of celebrated and accomplished female Native artists living and working in the Twin Cities.  The show was curated by Dyani White Hawk and includes the work of Carolyn Anderson, Julie Buffalohead, Andrea Carlson, Elizabeth Day, Heid E. Erdrich, Louise Erdrich, and Maggie Thompson.

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