MN Reads

Join us Thursday mornings at 8:20 for Minnesota Reads on Northland Morning,  featuring Minnesota authors talking about their work.

Minnesota Reads is supported in part by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Printmaker Cecilia Lieder thinks of herself as a storyteller ... but it was only recently she decided to try her hand at writing them down.  The result is "Wilderness Tales," one of this years NEMBA nominees in the Memoir category.

Red Dragonfly Press

  This summer, we're bringing you books about the Northland, from the Northland and by Northland authors.  The Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards (NEMBA) were  established in 1988 to recognize books that "substantially represent northeastern Minnesota in the areas of history, culture, heritage, or lifestyle."

The Master Key Press

This summer, we're bringing you books about the Northland, from the Northland and by Northland authors.  The Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards (NEMBA) were  established in 1988 to recognize books that "substantially represent northeastern Minnesota in the areas of history, culture, heritage, or lifestyle." Our guest is Tera Freese.  Her book of poetry, Remind Me That I'm Wild [The Master Key Press], with illustrations by Lindy Kehoe, was nominated for a NEMBA award in the Children's Literature category.

 

Author Elliot Foster on the challenge of making the ubiquitous Minnesota "cabin" experience both recognizable ... and unique.

Tim Jollymore's dad worked for the railroad when he was growing up in Proctor.

A writing class with a personal hero and a lovable Lab sparked this first - but not last - children's book about Norman.

You may not be a "journal-er" yourself ... but Kevin Proescholdt's "Glimpses of Wilderness" may just inspire you. 

This summer, Minnesota Reads is bringing you books about the Northland, from the Northland and by Northland authors.  The Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards (NEMBA) were established in 1988 to recognize books that "substantially represent northeastern Minnesota in the areas of history, culture, heritage, or lifestyle."  Our guest is Aimee Bissonette, whose book, North Woods Girl (Minnesota Historical Society Press), was nominated for the NEMBA award in the Children's Literature category.

This summer, Minnesota Reads is bringing you books about the Northland, from the Northland and by Northland authors.  The Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards (NEMBA) were established in 1988 to recognize books that "substantially represent northeastern Minnesota in the areas of history, culture, heritage, or lifestyle."  Our guest is Victoria Richards whose first novel, Once Were Mountains (Beaver's Pond Press), won the NEMBA award in the Fiction category

Last week, it was fascinating to discover how well Duluth and the Northland fit into the moody-atmospheric-stark-Scandinavian-crime-fiction genre.

This week?  Guess what fits neatly into the moody-atmospheric-gothic-horror genre?

You'll never look at the historic Old Central High School the same way again.

For Brian Laidlaw,  Bob Dylan wasn't just a role model, he was the role model for the aspiring poet/musician.

In this, his first book of poetry, Laidlaw envisions Bob Dylan as a stunt man, taking the risks that, perhaps, Robert Zimmerman would have been unable to take. The result is, according to the author, "A loud book by a quiet person."

Just in time for our month-long celebration of 30 years of Laura Erickson's For The Birds -- a long-awaited field guide to the birds she's been telling us about since 1986.

Ann Treacy's new book for "middle grades" sheds light on a perhaps unexpected chapter of Minnesota history: the Romani people in the state around the turn of the last century.

If you were a little bewildered trying to follow the action the first time you read Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland ... you're not alone.

But for one reader, it was like coming home.

Erika Adams has Auditory Processing Disorder, a kind of breakdown between what the ear hears and what the brain processes.  People with APD can have trouble making sense of what other people say - rather like Alice in Wonderland. 

Erika recognized the similarities right away ... and channelled them into her novella.

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