MN Reads

Join us Thursday mornings at 8:20 for Minnesota Reads on Northland Morning,  featuring Minnesota authors talking about their work.

Funding provided in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund

Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund

Given the choice between a cash prize for their annual contest and a chance to get published, the Lake Superior Writers voted back in 2016 to get published.

The result is one of the best possible souvenirs of the Northland: a book about the lake by people who live near it and love it.

Lois Rafferty has spoken, written and taught about issues of grief and loss for years.

But it wasn't until she wrote Carnie's Child that she learned that "everyone has a painful story inside of them."

Open Books

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Lorin R. Robinson, the author of Tales From The Warming published in 2017 by Open Books.

Combining scientific fact with narrative fiction, the book is a collection of 10 short stories set in the near future at different locations around the globe.  Robinson's characters struggle to manage, mitigate, or at least come to grips with inevitable change due to the effects of global warming in their environments.

Many Minnesotans have fond memories of traveling for a weekend at the lake. Along with that trip to the lake came unique stories that have been passed on year after year.

Tim Jollymore takes his readers to the lake in his book, "Lake Stories and Other Tales" where he recreates some of those memories people have held onto. 

Not what they've got on offer now, that's for sure.

Dr John Pastor has been at UMD 32 years, and in that time, has seen moose populations go from healthy to depleted.

But the quality of their habitat is only part of the picture - and the research - into what keeps moose populations healthy and able to bounce back from hard years.

Pastor's book does more than answer the question "what should a clever moose eat?"

It helps explain why we should care.

  "It was as if the water remembered."

Jacqueline Briggs Martin's latest is the true story of a creek - and a man - finding their way home.

University of Minnesota Press

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Douglas Wood, the author of Deep Woods, Wild Waters: A Memoir, published in 2017 by University of Minnesota Press.

The book is a personal and familial reflection on his lifelong connection to the promise and of nature.

  

Hello Mudda, hello Faddah
Here I am at Camp Grenada
Camp is very entertaining
And they say we'll have some fun if it stops raining

I went hiking with Joe Spivey
He developed poison ivy.
You remember Leonard Skinner
He got Ptomaine poisoning last night after dinner

Wait a minute, it's stopped hailing Guys are swimming, guys are sailing
Playing baseball, gee that's bettah
Muddah, Faddah kindly disregard this letter

The incomparable Dudley Riggs on the international incident he created that changed the face of a nation, how Ringling Bros. "killed the brand," and why he still dreams of flying. 

Susan Price is tired of plants being just ... wallpaper for our lives.

She wants us to think about them: to recognize their importance, to set aside land for them, and to think about the people whose lives revolve around them

Author Nora Murphy had a lot of questions about the land her family settled when they came to America, fleeing the potato famine in Ireland.

In a series of essays dedicated to trees in Minnesota, Murphy walks the line, as Heid Erdrich put it, between writing "what she has learned of people, not about them."

Author Sarah Stonich published Shelter in 2011, when she was a single mother looking for connections to home and family for herself and her son.

Now Shelter is out in paperback, and Stonich has written an epilogue, dated this year, that reveals much about journeys, priorities, dreams that come true but no longer fit ... and the often underestimated importance of indoor plumbing.

Despite a gardening career that spans decades, author John Whitman says he thought he knew more than he did when he sat down to produce Fresh From The Garden: An Organic Guide to Growing Vegetables, Berries and Herbs in Cold Climates.

A friend's collection of mystery stories by Minnesota authors sparked this collection of short stories for young readers.  Editors Jay Peterson and Collette Morgan discovered, too, that just because a reader is young doesn't mean they're not thinking about what they read.

Sky Blue Water includes a Q&A between kids and the contributing authors, as well as discussion and writing prompts for classrooms or book groups.

The fun and funny Lorna Landvik joins us to talk about why she never reads her books again once she writes them, the characters who yammer in her head and why she believes "quirkiness will prevail."

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