MN Reads

Join us Thursday mornings at 8:20 for Minnesota Reads on Northland Morning,  featuring Minnesota authors talking about their work.

Minnesota Reads is supported in part by a grant from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

  "It was as if the water remembered."

Jacqueline Briggs Martin's latest is the true story of a creek - and a man - finding their way home.

University of Minnesota Press

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Douglas Wood, the author of Deep Woods, Wild Waters: A Memoir, published in 2017 by University of Minnesota Press.

The book is a personal and familial reflection on his lifelong connection to the promise and of nature.

  

Hello Mudda, hello Faddah
Here I am at Camp Grenada
Camp is very entertaining
And they say we'll have some fun if it stops raining

I went hiking with Joe Spivey
He developed poison ivy.
You remember Leonard Skinner
He got Ptomaine poisoning last night after dinner

Wait a minute, it's stopped hailing Guys are swimming, guys are sailing
Playing baseball, gee that's bettah
Muddah, Faddah kindly disregard this letter

The incomparable Dudley Riggs on the international incident he created that changed the face of a nation, how Ringling Bros. "killed the brand," and why he still dreams of flying. 

Susan Price is tired of plants being just ... wallpaper for our lives.

She wants us to think about them: to recognize their importance, to set aside land for them, and to think about the people whose lives revolve around them

Author Nora Murphy had a lot of questions about the land her family settled when they came to America, fleeing the potato famine in Ireland.

In a series of essays dedicated to trees in Minnesota, Murphy walks the line, as Heid Erdrich put it, between writing "what she has learned of people, not about them."

Author Sarah Stonich published Shelter in 2011, when she was a single mother looking for connections to home and family for herself and her son.

Now Shelter is out in paperback, and Stonich has written an epilogue, dated this year, that reveals much about journeys, priorities, dreams that come true but no longer fit ... and the often underestimated importance of indoor plumbing.

Despite a gardening career that spans decades, author John Whitman says he thought he knew more than he did when he sat down to produce Fresh From The Garden: An Organic Guide to Growing Vegetables, Berries and Herbs in Cold Climates.

A friend's collection of mystery stories by Minnesota authors sparked this collection of short stories for young readers.  Editors Jay Peterson and Collette Morgan discovered, too, that just because a reader is young doesn't mean they're not thinking about what they read.

Sky Blue Water includes a Q&A between kids and the contributing authors, as well as discussion and writing prompts for classrooms or book groups.

The fun and funny Lorna Landvik joins us to talk about why she never reads her books again once she writes them, the characters who yammer in her head and why she believes "quirkiness will prevail."

Minnesota Historical Society

Orders given, orders recieved, courts-martial ...

An almost 200 year old order book, compiled by Colonel Josiah Snelling's adjutant between 1826 and 1827, recorded details of the U.S. Army's 5th Infantry Regiment beginning a year after the frontier outpost Fort St. Anthony was renamed after its commander.

When canoe enthusiasts Mark Neuzil and Norman Sims set out to write the first book on the history of canoes in the entire North American continent, their goal was to find the best illustrations they could.

To that end, they commissioned two oil paintings and a series of maps from a Minnesota cartographer to create a book that, more than anything, seems to be about memories.

Bea Ojakangas has written a lot of cookbooks over the years ... and delivered a lot of talks about it.

In fact, one of those talks, called "Cooking Up A Book," prompted the University of Minnesota Press to ask for this new book: a memoir (with recipes).

The wave of grassroots feminist organizing that built beginning in the late '70s had its origin in some unlikely places.

Women who immigrated to America from Finland - some of whom came alone - had had the right to vote since 1906, and they got right to work organizing and publishing a feminist newspaper.

The Anishinaabe had a long woman-centric tradition until the advent of the boarding schools, where women were honored in the society.

And then there's the lake and the wilderness. "It draws certain kinds of people," says author Beth Bartlett.  "It's restorative."

Emily Bestler Books

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Mindy Mejia, the author the novel Everything You Want Me to Be, published by Emily Bestler Books in 2017.  

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