Green Visions

A Northland Morning feature focusing on local environmental issues, heard Wednesdays at 8:20 a.m.  Green Visions is brought to you by Duluth Grill and Heritage Window and Door.

Slow food.

Slow TV.

"Tractor porn."

Seriously.

Dave Anderson

Local meteorologist Dave Anderson weighs in on El Niño,  the possibilities of March blizzards and the Northland's possible weather comeuppance next winter.

IRPS/Facebook

If you can dream up a way to make the Iron Range a more sustainable place ... you can enter your idea in their Community Sustainability Initiative contest.  And if you win, you get to build it - and they will come!

Doug Eastick/Flickr

It's probably no surprise that a hockey program here in Duluth is the last one in North America where the mite level practices exclusively outdoors.

In addition to being cheaper than renting indoor ice time, "pond hockey" is a whole, almost-forgotten culture.

D B Young/Flickr

Weather is what we experience day to day.  Climate is what sets up the conditions that result in the weather.  Climate change isn't linear ... but it is intensifying.

So what can individuals do?  Dr. Randy Hanson is the Co-Director of the Program in Environment and Sustainability, and he says we start by making some demands.

In addition to 350.org, Randy recommends:

Short Answers to Hard Questions about Climate Change

Lake Minnesuing Farm

They eat invasive species like buckthorn and Canada Thistle.  They don't like grass, so they leave it alone.  They give milk, they're smart and have fun personalities.

So what could possibly be a downside to allowing goats - as pets or as livestock - in the city limits?  That's what the city of Duluth is trying to figure out.

MN Department of Natural Resources

Deer hunters who had to spend almost as much time hunting through the Minnesota DNR's web site for the information they wanted, take heart - the DNR's new interactive map - and the "detailed report" link - puts everything you need to know just a click away.

Trudy Vrieze, Vrieze Photography

What's sending bald eagles flocking to the the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center?

Whatever it is, it isn't good.

Sick and injured bald eagles - already 50 more birds this year than last year at this time - are crowding the center.   And the busiest hospitalization period - as eagles begin to show up poisoned by lead shot left in gut piles by deer hunters - has just begun.

David Syring

What plants do people pay attention to?  What plants have a traditional use as food or medicine?

David Syring's Ethnobotany students are not only looking into that very topic, they're creating a "story map" with the information.

For more information or to volunteer your expertise, you can email David Syring or contact him through the Duluth Phenology Facebook page.

enjoiskate8/Flickr

Northeastern Minnesota was never the land of the buffalo, but it was home to elk, before overhunting and habitat loss decimated the population.

Now the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa is betting on funding from the LCCMR (Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources) to look into restoring wild elk to a portion of their former range.

Bill Mittlefehldt

You almost need a program to keep track of all the clean energy projects going on in the Northland these days.

Work continues on the 2025 Action Plan, the Georgetown University Energy Prize Competition and the Arrowhead Energy Cooperative just opened a solar garden for its customers.

Sarah Glesner

There are dozens of environmental organizations in the Twin Ports and almost all of them expand their reach and their resources by partnering with one another on different projects. 

But recently, the St. Louis River Alliance sat down for a meeting and instead of the regular troop of khaki- and jean-clad biologists and environmentalists, they were inundated with architects, landscapers and urban planners courtesy of Design Duluth.

St. Louis River Estuary

Diane Desotelle of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says it's a pretty good time to be a fish in the St. Louis River.

But it's going to get better. 

Through a network of unique partnerships and collaboration, the clean materials the US Army Corps of Engineers is dredging from ship channels in the harbor will be repurposed in the river to create better habitat for fish, including muskie, northern pike and walleye.

Will Steger.com

A man who's seen the effects of climate change first hand talked to Iron Rangers and guests last week at the Iron Range Convening.

Produced by Climate Generation, the University of Minnesota Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships and the Iron Range Partnership for Sustainability,  Will Steger was the keynote speaker for the event, an opportunity to not only talk about climate change, but share ideas on how to combat it.

Iron Range Partnership for Sustainability

If you want folks to learn about lakes, perhaps the best way is to hold the meeting on a beach.  In July.  And then give them all nets and send them in search of the lake creatures you've just told them about.

The Iron Range Partnership for Sustainability is holding monthly get-togethers to help folks understand the resources they cherish, everything from lakes to locally-grown food to clean energy.

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