Change Your Mind: Living with Mental Illness

It's Mental Health Week, and we're kicking off a special weeklong series on Northland Morning called "Change Your Mind: Living with Mental Illness."

TXT4LIFE started right here in the Northland in 2011.
No matter who you are, if you need someone to talk to, text “Life” to 61222.   A trained counselor will respond to your text. Find out more about TXT4LIFE at txt4life.org

Monday, 10/5 | 8am
Mary McClernon is here to talk about family and social support
Tuesday, 10/6 | 8am
David Lee talks about The Birch Tree Center and crisis support - how new options for treatment serve both the patient and the community better
Wednesday, 10/7 | 8am
Rick Gertsema talks about DBT, a kind of therapy designed to help people with mental illness increase their coping skills, identify emotional triggers and change unhelpful behavior patterns.  And it might work for you, too!
Thursday, 10/8 | 8am
Street Outreach worker Deb Holman talks about the Catch-22 of discharge planning - how mentally ill people can insist they be discharged from the hospital even if they have nowhere to go or no one to help them.
Friday, 10/9 | 8am
Jackie Buffington-Vollum talks about the work she does training the Duluth Police Department and others to safely de-escalate a mental health crisis and connect people with mental health resources instead of jail.

Christiaan Tonnis/Flickr

Are we substituting jails for insane asylums in America?

Deb Holman:CHUM/HDC Street Outreach Advocate

At the turn of the 20th century, people with mental illness were still being locked up in institutions.

100 years later, they're still being institutionalized, but now, they're mainly ending up in jail.

Work by Allie Brosh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

DBT (or Dialectical Behavior Therapy) may sound intimidating, but it's really just teaching a set of skills to help people manage stress better.

begemot_dn/Flickr

What's the number-one chronic health condition in northeastern Minnesota?

David Lee says depression.

The director of Public Health and Human Services for Carlton County is also a licensed mental health professional, and he says depression leads 2-1 over the next leading chronic health condition.

But there are some interesting changes in the works that may make mental health care more routine ... and reduce the percieved stigma at the same time.  Plus a new facility in Duluth aimed at giving folks a quiet safe place to regroup as an alternative to a locked facility.

Work by Allie Brosh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

It's Mental Health Week, and we're kicking off a special weeklong series on Northland Morning called "Change Your Mind: Living with Mental Illness." 

One out of every four people you know could experience a mental health problem in their lifetime.  Few things are as important to recovery from a physical - or mental illness - as family and societal support.  But as an "invisible disability" - because you may not "look sick" to others ... sometimes that support is lacking.