Backyard Almanac

Phenology with local naturalist Larry Weber every Friday morning at 8:20 on Northland Morning. Have a question for Larry Weber? Email us and you might hear his answer on the show!

 

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Anita Ritenour

Author and naturalist Larry Weber observes the final week of summer, noting the warmer temps (10 degrees above average for September!).  The leaves are already starting to change: Maples, sumacs, dogwoods are turning red, but so are Virginia creeper and poison ivy. Yellow leaves to look out for are the ash, birch and poplar trees. Birds are migrating – this is "hawk weekend" in the Duluth area.  Geese and cranes are in motion, as are the warblers, thrushes and flickers, among others. 

nancybeetoo (via Flickr)

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber notes how the late summer rains have brought an abundance of mushrooms. Glowworms have been out and about.  The trees are starting to change color as fall moves in, and with fall comes the migration of birds – some say the greatest in recent memory.  Both raptors (hawks, eagles) and non-raptors (Canada geese, warblers and blue jays, et al.) have been sighted. Snakes too!

Gavin Schaefer/Flickr

Laura Erickson says no one who knows anything about real nighthawks would ever consider naming their sports team after them ... but Larry Weber has enjoyed watching their migration this week, anyway.

Plus he's been watching hawks migrate at Hawk Ridge,  thrilled to the hundreds of spider webs that showed up so clearly with foggy dewdrops on them and, of course, spent time appreciating "the fungus among us" after the rains.

Thorsburg Photography

Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory has been counting migrants on the ridge for two weeks already, the sun is setting before 8pm and reds and yellows are popping up in all kinds of trees and bushes.

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says goodbye to August and hello to autumn.

Flickr/ Vicki DeLoach

Who is that happy bearded man sitting in a patch of goldenrod?

Chances are, it's author and naturalist Larry Weber.

(Oh, and don't get him started on goldenrod being blamed for the allergens of ragweed!)

Biodiversity Heritage Library

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the heat, the Heat, and the HEAT. The days are getting shorter, so he has noticed the beginning of fall bird migration, including chimney swifts and nighthawks.  Gray tree frogs are calling, goldenrod and asters are in bloom, and the blackberries are ripe.  Not many mushrooms, unfortunately, even though we received some rain over the past week.

Jared Smith

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the welcome rain (hopefully reviving the mushroom population), as well as the Perseids meteor shower, migrating birds, tree frogs, insects, wildflowers, and blackberries.  Larry also has noted that some leaves are beginning to show autumn color – the birches in particular are changing early, perhaps due to the dry weather.  

Mario Klingemann/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks spiderwebs, continues to defend goldenrod from its undeserved reputation as an allergen, and warns against eating baneberry: "it is a bit nasty."

Author and naturalist Larry Weber is back in his own backyard this week, enjoying the flowering of the mid-summer wildflowers, the fledgling birds and particularly, berry season.  Oh, and he says we'll get a second full moon this month, and everyone knows that only happens once in a blue moon!

Bruce McKay/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber joins us from Crested Butte, Colorado, where he's taking in the Wildflower Festival and enjoying some new flora and fauna.

Lisa Johnson

Author and naturalist Larry Weber answers a listener's question about white pelicans and observes that the record temperature set in Duluth (taken by the lake, no less!) of 106 degrees, July 13, 1936 has not yet been broken!

Sandy Roggenkamp

Author and naturalist Larry Weber wraps up out June weather (a little bit warmer and drier than usual) and trots out some plain brown butterflies with exotic and lovely names: Little Wood-Satyr, Ringlet and Northern Pearly-eye. 

And in other news, the elusive Larry Weber was captured on camera, working on a survey of the Sax-Zim Bog!

Tom Tetzner/Flickr

After a year underwater, the frog eggs of last summer have matured to tadpoles and beyond.  Author and naturalist Larry Weber says finally,  the Frogs of Summer are all grown up.

Vicki DeLoach/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says the big insect news this week is dragonflies, including a huge emergence of calico pennants.

Larry Weber, naturalist, educator and host of Backyard Almanac, tells us that June is typically "the lawn-mowing month" due to the increase in rain, sun, and temps that conspire to make the grass grow quickly. Orchids, ferns and mushrooms are also abundant.  The irises are emerging, baby birds and fireflies are too.  

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