Backyard Almanac

Phenology with local naturalist Larry Weber every Friday morning at 8:20 on Northland Morning. Have a question for Larry Weber? Email us and you might hear his answer on the show!

 

Ways to Connect

Bruce McKay/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber joins us from Crested Butte, Colorado, where he's taking in the Wildflower Festival and enjoying some new flora and fauna.

Lisa Johnson

Author and naturalist Larry Weber answers a listener's question about white pelicans and observes that the record temperature set in Duluth (taken by the lake, no less!) of 106 degrees, July 13, 1936 has not yet been broken!

Sandy Roggenkamp

Author and naturalist Larry Weber wraps up out June weather (a little bit warmer and drier than usual) and trots out some plain brown butterflies with exotic and lovely names: Little Wood-Satyr, Ringlet and Northern Pearly-eye. 

And in other news, the elusive Larry Weber was captured on camera, working on a survey of the Sax-Zim Bog!

Tom Tetzner/Flickr

After a year underwater, the frog eggs of last summer have matured to tadpoles and beyond.  Author and naturalist Larry Weber says finally,  the Frogs of Summer are all grown up.

Vicki DeLoach/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says the big insect news this week is dragonflies, including a huge emergence of calico pennants.

Larry Weber, naturalist, educator and host of Backyard Almanac, tells us that June is typically "the lawn-mowing month" due to the increase in rain, sun, and temps that conspire to make the grass grow quickly. Orchids, ferns and mushrooms are also abundant.  The irises are emerging, baby birds and fireflies are too.  

Chiot's Run/Flickr

Larry Weber's walks this week turned up more trees in bloom, blossoms of wild rose and honeysuckle, new June wildflowers away from the woods and out in the open ... and a baby porcupine, which he did not try to pick up!

Julie Falk/Flickr

That car, doing 10 mph down the road and weaving a little bit, as though the driver's not paying attention?

Naturalist Larry Weber says that's him, gawking at spring.

MagnoliaWarbler
Flickr // hjhipster

Skip work today.  Play hooky.

That's the word from Backyard Almanac's naturalist, educator and radio host, Larry Weber.

There are 26 species of warblers to identify, yellow lady slipper orchids to go in search of, red-winged blackbirds and black-winged red birds to enjoy, and "in addition to that", it's "toad time."

It took January, February, March and April to produce as much moisture as May has in two weeks.  Author, naturalist and educator Larry Weber tells us the difference it's making with the local flora and fauna.

Yellowstone National Park/Flickr

On Wednesday, we told you a story about a frog survey being done of the vernal ponds at Hartley Park.  Ryan Hueffmeier of the NRRI says its a listening survey, conducted by himself and citizen-scientists just after dark or before dawn.

Just this last week, naturalist Larry Weber took part in a similar survey: driving a 20 mile route and making stops at 12 dedicated wetlands to listen for frog calls.

Mraz Center for the Performing Arts

"Tra la, it's May, the lusty month of May
That lovely month when everyone goes blissfully astray...
"

"The Lusty Month of May" (From "Camelot") was written by Lerner and Loewe

Larry Weber elects not to sing, but he's got our April wrap-up (warmer and drier than usual), the word on spring wildflowers (wetter woods would help them) and a look back (on this date in 2013 and 2014, there was still ice on the lakes and snow on the ground in many places!).

 

Brendan Lally

Larry Weber talks with us this morning about the imminent arrival of spring.  Some new buds and leaves are appearing in the smaller shrubs, and he's seen some fiddleheads as well.  Among the returning birds are the hermit thrush, the Louisiana water thrush and the towhee (pictured).  Also, signs of activity from the ground squirrels, moles, dragonflies and snakes. 

Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber talks about the nomination of his book, "Backyard Almanac: 365 Days of Northern Natural History"  for a Northeastern Minnesota Book Award and the new birds, bees and frogs he's seen and heard this week.

Larry Weber is an educator, naturalist and author and he's our guest every Friday for Backyard Almanac on Northland Morning.  In addition, we've got a few copies of his updated "Backyard Almanac" as a thank you gift with your membership at $60.00 or higher!

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