Backyard Almanac

Phenology with local naturalist Larry Weber every Friday morning at 8:20 on Northland Morning. Have a question for Larry Weber? Email us and you might hear his answer on the show!

 

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Arturo Pardavila III /Flickr

Aut-win continues apace and with it, the dance of the crane flies and the appearance of the World Series moths.

Joe Lapp - Flickr

Larry Weber says it's tamarack time!!  He's also spotted ballooning baby spiders, "World Series" moths and shaggy-name mushrooms.

If those names confuse you, it's ok: you've just entered the season of Aut-Win.

Lisa Johnson

Phase one is the showy fall color of September trees.

Phase two is the yellow gold of the aspens at the beginning of October.

Last but not least: phase three.  The tamaracks show up everyone else with their show mid-October. 

Chrissine Cairns Rios/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 9, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 2, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Larry says we had the third warmest September on record ... and that's good news for late season wildflowers like the New England Aster.

Brenda Dobbs/Flickr

A thousand hawks migrating over Hawk Ridge, the leaves changing color - those are signs of the season that are easy to see.  But Larry Weber says if you're paying attention, you can find things like eyelash fungus on downed logs and something called pinwheel fungus that he's seen sprout out of a single pine needle!

In Larry's last report of the summer (next Thursday marks the equinox and the start of fall), he talks about the warmer- and wetter-than-average weather, glow worms, "beard fungus" and the joys of Hawk Ridge.

 

Paul VerDerWerf [via Flickr]

After an abundance of rain in recent days, naturalist Larry Weber says the weekend should be a fine time to get out and find mushrooms.  Late summer and early fall brings the beginning of fall colors, and many birds are starting to take wing, including hawks, flickers, blue jays, thrushes and turkeys. Even as temps start to turn cooler, many insects are still abundant, including green darner dragonflies, bees and butterflies. Larry has been hearing spring peepers and gray tree frogs in the woods, and the other day witnessed a new baby snapping turtle searching for the water.

Bill Damon/Flickr

Larry Weber is perhaps the only person to get distracted from the pursuit of blackberries, just to watch insects enjoying goldenrod.

Larry Weber says purple wildflowers abound in nature right now.

The Northland Morning host is inclined to believe that's a nod to her NFL football team, but the Northland Morning host is a little funny that way.

Kevin Bolton [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes that, as the days grow shorter (now just 14 hours of daylight), many birds are on the move, including large families of warblers ("warbler waves"), raptors, geese, and nighthawks. The rain has brought out many mushrooms. Butterflies are on the scene, and so are cicadas, katydids and grasshoppers, and this means that spiders are on the hunt for insects! In plant life, fall flowers are blooming -- goldenrod, asters, and sunflowers (including Joe-Pye weed).

Gabriel F.W. Koch [via Flickr]

Even though the fog and cloud cover over the past few days have blocked our ability to see the Perseid meteor showers, the fog has highlighted spider webs beautifully. 

Lisa Johnson

Folks in Larry Weber's Minnesota Master Naturalist class don't sit around the campfire telling scary stories ... they go out after dusk looking for spiders and spider webs instead.

Lisa Johnson

When some radio show hosts spend a few days camping at his Jay Cooke State Park stomping grounds, naturalist Larry Weber gets stuck trying to explain what they've seen and photographed.

©Christopher Harwood

"And when you smile for the camera
I know I'll love you better...."

~ Peg, written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen

Larry Weber says recent rains have resulted in a wealth of "photogenic mushrooms," wildflowers are everywhere you look (learn more about the story behind the name of Joe-Pye weeds here) and everything from scarlet tanagers to summer frogs to the full moon are out to catch your eyes and ears.

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