warblers

For the first time in over a year, we have a month - May - where the temperature was cooler than normal.

But if anyone can find the silver lining in a cool, wet May, it would be Larry Weber.

Jack Pearce [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about these mid-May mornings that are "beyond description" with so much happening as nature awakes.  Also, because leaves have not fully grown out yet, it is a greater opportunity to see both flora in fauna as you explore the woods of northern Minnesota.

Kevin Bolton [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes that, as the days grow shorter (now just 14 hours of daylight), many birds are on the move, including large families of warblers ("warbler waves"), raptors, geese, and nighthawks. The rain has brought out many mushrooms. Butterflies are on the scene, and so are cicadas, katydids and grasshoppers, and this means that spiders are on the hunt for insects! In plant life, fall flowers are blooming -- goldenrod, asters, and sunflowers (including Joe-Pye weed).

Lisa Johnson

Folks in Larry Weber's Minnesota Master Naturalist class don't sit around the campfire telling scary stories ... they go out after dusk looking for spiders and spider webs instead.

MagnoliaWarbler
Flickr // hjhipster

Skip work today.  Play hooky.

That's the word from Backyard Almanac's naturalist, educator and radio host, Larry Weber.

There are 26 species of warblers to identify, yellow lady slipper orchids to go in search of, red-winged blackbirds and black-winged red birds to enjoy, and "in addition to that", it's "toad time."