Tom Kasper

lundy | hive/Flickr

Want to plant a tree?  Tom Kasper says the first thing is to look up.  Power or phone lines in the way?*  Relocate your tree.

Scot Nelson [via Flickr]

Tom Kasper talks about how the abundance of rain and resulting humidity in recent months is leading to a rise in powdery mildew, a fungal growth that affects many plants.  Gardeners are advised to look out for it, and possibly remove affected leaves to increase airflow around their plants help stave off its spread.

Overduebook/Flickr

Tom Kasper says gardeners are starting to think ahead to the "F word" - "frost," in this case - and worry a little that some fruits and vegetables won't ripen before the weather takes a turn.

But leave it to Master Gardener Tom Kasper to know just the tricks to allow your summer bounty to ripen on the vine instead of on a windowsill. 

It's green and destroys everything it touches.

(Not permanently, but it does do damage)

It's not wildfire; it's aphids.

Gardeners might be tempted toward a Cersei-type solution, but they'd be better off taking a more ... Targaryen approach: only with a garden hose instead of a dragon.

Never fear, though.  Tom Kasper says ... winter is coming.

David/Flickr

Master gardener Tom Kasper on what our rainy day/sunny day/ rainy day pattern might be good for.

Evan Long/Flickr

"Don't change the height of the mower dramatically!"

"Don't cut below 2 1/2 inches!"

"I'm busy crowding out other weeds; leave me alone!"

Master gardener Tom Kasper says listen to your lawn: it might surprise you.

Lisa Johnson

You can even sing today's forecast if you want to: The sun'll come out ... tomorrow ...

So if you're ready to take advantage of a little sunshine and some warm temperatures for a change, Tom Kasper says maybe one of the many classes this spring on bee-friendly gardening has inspired you.

You can do everything from giving over your whole yard to pollinator-friendly plants or just do one thing: remember, when you buy plants, to make sure they have NOT been exposed to neonicotinoids.

cool.as.a.cucumber/Flickr

There are a couple of big plant sale events coming up in the Northland, but given the weather recently, it's a great relief to know you won't have to camp overnight in line to get plants.

Show up at 4:00 am, maybe, but not camp overnight! 

Alan Weir/Flickr

If winter storm warnings on May Day weren't bad enough ... the weather was still lousy for World Naked Gardening Day.

And yes, that's a thing.  You can look it up.

Peter Prehn/Flickr

With a weekend forecast calling for sunshine and 60s, it's going to be hard for spring-starved Northlanders to stay out of their backyards.

Their wet, squishy backyards.

Tom Kasper says don't rake; prune instead.

Tom Kasper

Those weird lights glowing at all hours in Tom Kasper's basement?

Grow lights, trying to give his onion seedlings the 60-70 degrees and the 14 hours of daylight they need to grow into fine, big, grown-up onions.

That's our story and we're sticking to it.

Apium [via Flickr, modified]

In these turbulent March days where perennials may start to peek out of the ground, a few days of drastic cold may come around as damage their early growth.  Tom Kasper advises covering those garden beds with loose straw to provide an insulating layer to help keep out the cold air.

Tom Kasper

Tom Kasper is wondering where he can get some snow.

"February 20th and my bee balm is sprouting," he writes on his Facebook page.  "I'm all for an early spring. But this is a little too early!"

Perhaps the immortal words of Simon and Garfunkel are what our perennials need about now:

Slow down; you move too fast

You've got to make the winter last ...!

Tom Kasper

Tom Kasper is ignoring the -20 to -30 below windchills of the next few days, and the melting mid-30s after that in favor of  his plant and seed catalogs, where lawns are green,  gardens are lush and all the dahlias are above average.

Steve James/Flickr

So you have a shrubbery in your yard, perhaps close to the street or your driveway.

Maybe you even have an additional shrubbery, perhaps with a little path between the two.

So what do you do when the only place to plow or shovel snow is ... on your shrubbery?

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