Standing Rock

Sarah Setayeshi

If you're passionate about how U.S. policy affects Latin America, you understand why Witness to Peace made a recent fact-finding mission to Honduras.

Even if you're not, your travels may bring you back around to taking part in things happening right here in your own back yard.

Witness to Peace is having an event this evening beginning at 6pm, and you can click here for more information.

Photo by Rob Wilson Photography

An update on Standing Rock from Minnesota Native News…The confrontation continues to escalate near the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. Near the front lines, police have been spraying dozens of people with rubber bullets, mace and water in below freezing temperatures.  Contributor Roy Taylor talks with a mother and son from Minneapolis about their participation and support.  Minnesota Native News will be sharing an update from Standing Rock again nest week.  

Minnesota Native News airs Monday's at 7am on Northland Morning and at 4pm Monday's during the World Cafe.

Rob Wilson Photograpy

This week on Minnesota Native News, the first of three updates on the standoff at Standing Rock over the Dakota Access Pipeline.  Listen for an update on the clash of interests around oil and water and  how this conflict has attracted the attention and support of Indigenous people around the world and here in Minnesota. With a Minnesota perspective, this week's guest contributor is Roy Taylor, member of the Pawnee Nation and host of “Indigeneity Now” on Ampers' station KFAI.

Rob Wilson Photography

This week on Minnesota Native News we hear community cries to bring Minnesota law enforcement home from Standing Rock, Leech Lake celebrates American Indian Heritage Month and educators begin a year-long course in Minnesota’s American Indian history. 

Minnesota Native News returns to Northland Morning each Monday at 7am starting December  5, 2016.

Reyna Crow

Many environmentalists and tribes have been united in recent years and months over proposed mining or pipeline projects they’re concerned post a hazard to our Minnesota waterways.  But on the Standing Rock reservation in south central North Dakota, a quiet, lonely place where three biggest towns have under a thousand people each, some kind of tipping point has been reached.  On this reservation in the middle of nowhere, where about 15-thousand people live on just over two million acres of land thousands of native people and allies have gathered to shut down construction of the Dakota Access