spring

©Tone Coughlin Photography. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

The first half of April ended in a most dramatic fashion: record-breaking (low) temperatures, high winds, crashing waves and a record snowfall.

And while it certainly wasn't appreciated by everyone, Larry Weber says it was still fascinating.

Torn between longing for signs of spring and the excitement of a winter snowstorm, Northlanders can find a little something to make everyone happy.

Larry Weber returns from his peregrinations with a look into the future at The Spring To Come ... and marvels at February: it's only the second time in 40 years that it's been the snowiest month!

Lisa Johnson

April is unpredictable, says Larry Weber.  It went along predictably enough, lulling us into a false sense of security and then, predictably, it became ... unpredictable.

Len Blumin/Flickr

Larry says the weekend's predicted mild temperatures are perfect for seeing melty "tree circles" around deciduous trees, bright red red osier dogwood, pussy willow and quaking aspen buds and maybe even a horned lark.

Meanwhile ... the maple sap is flowing!

amazingpict.com

Larry Weber says a 60 degree weekend in March is kinda like a box of chocolates: 

it's no diet for the long run, but it is a lovely treat once in a while.

Brendan Lally

Larry Weber talks with us this morning about the imminent arrival of spring.  Some new buds and leaves are appearing in the smaller shrubs, and he's seen some fiddleheads as well.  Among the returning birds are the hermit thrush, the Louisiana water thrush and the towhee (pictured).  Also, signs of activity from the ground squirrels, moles, dragonflies and snakes. 

Author, naturalist and educator Larry Weber talks about this week's amazing northern lights and introduces us to the companion of his famous season Aut-Win: Win-Sprin!

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says the last five springs have been very unusual: either dryer and warmer than usual or colder and snowier.