Ryan Hueffmeier

Cafe Scientifique Twin Ports

Here's how (very loosely) the scientific method works:

  • Ask a question about something you observe.
  • Do some background research.
  • Develop an educated guess about why or how things happen.
  • Test your guess (hypotheses) through experimentation.
  • Analyze your data and draw a conclusion.
  • Then either communicate your results or back up and draw a new hypotheses with the new information.

At any rate ... it's more fun in a group - especially when it comes to debating the whys and wherefores and the conclusions. 

Lisa Johnson

No one's figured out how to literally plug in students and run lights and power from their boundless energy ... but UMD is coming close.

In addition to all new and renovated buildings being LEED-certified  (like Cina Hall, seen here), Sustainability Month at UMD is designed to educate students and the community about the work and research being done on campus.

But the students already get it.  In fact, many of the new initiatives in their early stages are led by students.

Dave Huth/Flickr

Citizen-scientists,  frog enthusiasts and lovers of moonlit walks can join Ryan Hueffmeier of the NRRI for the frog survey work now underway at Hartley Park.  It's part of a national frog survey that involves listening and identifying frog calls - much like the annual bird counts Laura Erickson and Larry Weber take part in.  But you don't have to be a naturalist to join in; when it comes to frog calls, Hueffmeier says, there's an app for that.