racism

The Duluth justice city coalition is hosting a march to dismantle the legacy of racism and build a community of peace this Saturday, October 14. Kim Young talked to us today and gave us details about the march.

The hope is to demand change within the community. 

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

It started as a gathering of Duluth clergy, worried about the events over the weekend in Charlottesville Virginia.  They wanted to construct and organize some kind of response to the events, from denouncing hatred to heading off what some see as an inevitable conflict between white nationalism and social justice advocates right here in our community.

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

A standing-room-only crowd packed St. Mark's A.M.E Church Sunday afternoon as community members of all colors gathered in response to the white nationalist rally Saturday that erupted into violence and resulted in three deaths.

KUMD was there, and we'll be bringing you stories from the gathering this week on Northland Morning.

CHUM's Lee Stuart; Stephan Witherspoon, president of the Duluth chapter of the NAACP and Carl Crawford, Duluth's human rights officer made up a panel which was moderated by St. Mark's Reverend Richard Coleman. 

Taiyon Coleman contributed one of the essays in this engrossing, eye-opening view of the state by sixteen  non-white writers.

Black, Latino, Asian and Indigenous voices share their Minnesota; what it's like to be a person of color in "one of the whitest states in the nation."

"The problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete.  They make one story become the only story."  ~ Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Max Goldberg/Iowa State Daily

Some UMD students of color took to social media last week, sending supportive messages to the students at the University of Missouri when anger over systemic racism at that school boiled over in protests.

Politics Off My Body

Public conversations about the idea of privilege are hard, and ironically, much of that is because of our proud heritage of "Minnesota Nice."  But they're important, because those with privilege and those without need to come together in a safe place, ask questions, and learn from one another. 

Photo by La Tanya S. Autry, June 2012/Flickr

UMD's University for Seniors program is offering an eight week course called "Racism in Duluth."  The instructor, 24 year old Jordan Moses, is the UMD Director of African American Student Programs.  He talks about what he and his class, separated by race and about five decades, are learning from one another.

Duluth Superintendent of Schools Bill Gronseth joined us to talk about the Think Kids Community Conversation starting this week.

Meetings of parents, neighbors, school administration and school board members will talk about what's going well and what could be done better in Duluth schools, how to address racism and what the recent in-depth demographic study means going forward.