powdery mildew

Scot Nelson [via Flickr]

Tom Kasper talks about how the abundance of rain and resulting humidity in recent months is leading to a rise in powdery mildew, a fungal growth that affects many plants.  Gardeners are advised to look out for it, and possibly remove affected leaves to increase airflow around their plants help stave off its spread.

F. D. Richards [via Flickr]

  The soggy ground continues to bring the threat of black molds and powdery mildew, and gardeners need to be mindful of what flowers and plants to prune, and what to keep and possibly treat to prevent the return of these fungi next spring.

Despite the soggy ground, now is the time to divide perennials - irises and peonies, for example - to best prepare them for next year.  Dividing can help underperforming flowers to produce more and better blooms in  the coming seasons.

Scot Nelson/Jamie Komata/Flickr

It's true: the warm weather, abundant rains and sunshine have produced bumper crops of just about everything - including black mold and powdery mildew.