Northland Morning Interviews

If you take your boring walk to the bus stop, the new notebooks and pencils and lined paper, and the drama over your date (or not) to the Homecoming Dance for granted - well, why shouldn't you?

This week on The Sea Grant Files, guest host Sharon Moen welcomes Dr. Thomas Beery, Minnesota Sea Grant coastal resilience specialist to talk about creating infrastructure with climate change in mind.  In the wake of so many weather related disasters during this hurricane season, preparing for a different climate future has been a big topic of conversation lately.  What does this look mean for Minnesota? Listen for more about green, blue-green and gray infrastructure and for more information to hear Dr. Beery speak at UMD.

Maija Jenson

Most people don't think of the 1925 silent film The Phantom of the Opera as the Raiders of the Lost Ark of it's time ... but then, most people haven't watched it every day for a week, getting ready to accompany it in a special performance at the Sacred Heart Music Center.

More information about tonight's performance of The Phantom of the Opera is available here.

Everyone is invited to the QASU Fall Drag Show at UMD Saturday night ...

It's performance art, it's history and culture ... and all you need to know is that it's a riotously good time.

(Oh, and have a supply of dollar bills, which you will HAND people.  No tucking money into folks' clothes; just HAND it to them like a nice person.)

Life House's new expansion is a ten-bed teen emergency shelter called The Loft.

The lack of affordable housing in Duluth plus misinformation - or no information - about why kids end up on the streets means there is still a gap between the number of kids with nowhere to go every night in Duluth  (100 on average) and the number of beds available.

Lack of affordable housing ... and a lack of imagination?  Life House director Maude Dornfeld says most people "can't imagine not loving their kids."

USFWS Mountain-Prairie/Flickr

The irony isn't lost on those who study these things.

Neonicotinoid pesticides were developed originally because they were thought to be less toxic to birds and wildlife than other options.  

The effects on pollinators are becoming widely examined  - and they're troubling - but now the MN DNR is into the third year of a study to see what happens to sharp-tailed grouse exposed to the chemicals.

And they're asking Minnesota grouse hunters to help them collect samples.

Jim Moran/Flickr

Despite what social media tells us (on our screens, no less), the line "The people will not revolt. They will not look up from their screens long enough to notice what’s happening" did not come from George Orwell's 1949 novel 1984.

It did, however, come from the stage play based on the novel, an adaptation by Robert Icke and Duncan MacMillan that premiered in 2013.

Regardless, the book and the stage show have sparked plenty of discussion recently as they resonate with readers and audiences in ways Orwell never thought possible in 1949.

Ira Salmela

The theme of Finland's 100th birthday is yhdessä, which means "together" in English. And Finns aren't letting a little thing like the five thousand miles separating the home country from the US stand in the way of all kinds of celebrations.

  One is a performance of the Runebergskören BSB, a Swedish-speaking male choir from Porvoo, Finland. And another is the performance of The Reading Room at the Douglas County Historical Society, a play written by Ann Tuomi based on a real-life experience.

Minnesota Historical Society

The heartbreak of dementia, obviously, is losing the ability to connect with someone you love.

But the solution could soon be in the palm of your hand. 

The Minnesota Historical Society is the first museum outside the UK to adapt the National Museums Liverpool's House of Memories app, a collection of images designed to spark recognition, memories and conversations between folks with dementia and their caregivers or loved ones.

SafetyPosters.com

The riskiest thing we do as Americans, for the most part, is get in our cars and drive.

After that, every five days in Minnesota, someone gets hurt on the job.

Fabiola Milla/Flickr

As recently as the 1970s, domestic abuse was seen as a private matter between a husband and wife.

If the police were called, it wasn't unheard of for them to just suggest the offender "take a walk around the block" and cool off.

From that societal climate, beginning in the 1980s, Duluth has become an international innovator in the way communities keep victims safe and hold perpetrators accountable.

©MN Department of Natural Resources

The age-old vacation question: to connect or not to connect?

Back in the day, with landline phones and rabbit-ear TV antennas, it was easy to disconnect from the outside world when you headed "up north."

But Minnesota's newest state park, Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park, has all-electric campsites - and wifi.

Community Action Duluth

The ground is broken and the Seeds of Success program is pretty sure their passive-solar winter greenhouse will be up and running before Christmas.

But in the meantime, from the Lincoln Park Farmer's Market, the peak of harvest season and a whole slew of community programs and partnerships, they've got a lot - in addition to vegetables - on their plate.

Lake Superior Zoo

"There were a number of lessons learned," remarks Erik Simonson, dryly.

Andrew M. Allen, US Army/Flickr

Minnesota's not prone to hurricanes like we've seen ravage Texas, Florida and parts south recently, but our cold winters bring their own dangers.

Like carbon monoxide poisoning.  10 to 20 deaths and over 50 hospitalizations happen every year thanks to gas stoves, furnaces, water heaters or any other kind of fuel-burning device that's not properly vented, maintained or installed.

And carbon monoxide detectors aren't just a good idea; they're the law.

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