Northland Morning Interviews

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Tristen Eberling from Ecolibrium3 about the Giving Comfort at Home program.  Many of our neighbors in Duluth are living in energy poverty.  Deciding whether to “heat or eat” happens too often with our long winters and old housing stock.

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Randy Hanson, PhD, the Co-Director of the Program in Environment and Sustainability at UMD about goings on at the UMD Land Lab, including their recently built "high tunnel" greenhouse, ongoing research in hydroponics, and the upcoming Farm Fest 2017 on September 17 at the UMD Sustainable Agriculture Project (SAP) Farm.

©Studio One Photography

If you have any doubts about Talia Martens' ability to race the 150 mile 2018 Jr. Iditarod, just look at her trainer/mentors: John Beargrease Sled Dog champion Jamie Nelson and Iditarod veteran Ryan Redington.

If you have any doubts about Talia Martens' tenacity to reach her goal - well, this is a girl who trains huskies in agility.

Maybe it's a little step, but for the first time, UMD's Music Department is sponsoring a recital of queer-identified faculty.

Derek Bromme, Elizabeth Fisher, Elias Mokole and Tom Hamilton of UWS are performing tonight at 7:30 at the Weber Music Hall in The Rainbow Connection Concert.

The translation of  Michael Perry's 2002 book,  Population 485, to a stage show at Big Top Chatauqua means he could invite all of New Auburn, Wisconsin and still have room left over under the big blue tent for, oh, Glen Haven.  Or Cary.

After a long time of mulling, re-reading and note-taking, Perry did the "heavy lifting" of preparing the script in Norb Blei's chicken coop over three days.  The resulting story is a clean, sparingly retold version of his memoir, without, as he puts it, "tacky drama" -- or one of his brothers.

Janice Liu

Back to school fills some kids with dread.

For them, the ringing of the class bell sounds like the bell that starts a boxing match - and here come the bullies.

New Moon Girls' back-to-school issue offers something a little different this year, though - not only nuts-and-bolts tools if you're seeing someone being bullied, but an approach you probably never thought of.

Loco Steve/Flickr

Getting from Point A to Point B is a big deal in Duluth.

There are a lot of options (walking, biking, public transportation, skiing) and a lot of challenges (weather, bike-friendly streets, access to transportation for folks without cars or with disabilities).

Aimee Foster from Community Action Duluth talks about their efforts to collect extra and unwanted apples for making Fruit Bits, a transitional employment program that turns otherwise unused apples into healthful and affordable fruit leathers sold at local stores.

Everyone is talking about the solar eclipse, occurring Monday across the north American continent.  In the Duluth area, it will not be total eclipse, a mere 80% coverage of the moon over the sun, but that is still a spectacular event to see.

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Funny they didn't offer a series of classes on "how to rehab old water-damaged buildings."

But there are plenty of treats in store for visitors to 1917 W Superior Street.

The new home of the Duluth Folk School will not only offer classroom space, in an effort to diversify and make the venture sustainable, they'll be renting out studio space (each with a skylight), offering a marketplace with locally handcrafted goods from instructors and tenants, and debuting The Dovetail Cafe.

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

It started as a gathering of Duluth clergy, worried about the events over the weekend in Charlottesville Virginia.  They wanted to construct and organize some kind of response to the events, from denouncing hatred to heading off what some see as an inevitable conflict between white nationalism and social justice advocates right here in our community.

St Louis County Public Works

When are you most likely to be involved in a serious - or fatal - car crash?

At a four-way intersection with a traffic light - when someone runs a red.

St Louis County has found a way to keep tabs on twice as many intersections with half the law enforcement officers - and that's good news for everyone but the folks who are driving impaired or distracted and blowing through the red lights. 

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

A standing-room-only crowd packed St. Mark's A.M.E Church Sunday afternoon as community members of all colors gathered in response to the white nationalist rally Saturday that erupted into violence and resulted in three deaths.

KUMD was there, and we'll be bringing you stories from the gathering this week on Northland Morning.

CHUM's Lee Stuart; Stephan Witherspoon, president of the Duluth chapter of the NAACP and Carl Crawford, Duluth's human rights officer made up a panel which was moderated by St. Mark's Reverend Richard Coleman. 

Sarah Setayeshi

If you're passionate about how U.S. policy affects Latin America, you understand why Witness to Peace made a recent fact-finding mission to Honduras.

Even if you're not, your travels may bring you back around to taking part in things happening right here in your own back yard.

Witness to Peace is having an event this evening beginning at 6pm, and you can click here for more information.

St Louis County Public Works

Maybe technology can't solve every problem, but it sure looks like a boon for residents of St. Louis  County.

Five Roadway Weather Information Systems (RWIS) have been installed around the county - four of which have weather cameras - and they'll be monitoring weather and road conditions this winter.

Not only does that cut down on the human beings you have to send out into a county that's 60 miles wide and twice as long, certain weather conditions trigger emails to maintenance supervisors so they can mobilize their crews - or not - depending on what the roads are like.

Pages