Northland Morning Interviews

©Life After Hate

Christian Piccolini wants you to know he didn't come from a broken home.

Nonetheless, he describes himself as a lonely 14 year old when a man approached him in an alley and his life changed.

Within two years, Piccolini was a leader of a white nationalist group, where he stayed until he was 22.

Piccolini made a stop in Duluth last week before he headed to Denver to take part in a TED conference.

But he took some time to talk to us about what's different - and the same - about hate groups and the only thing he knows that will stop them.

Matthew Olivolo/Flickr

Enhanced screenings at the Duluth International Airport rolled out Monday, but whatever time it takes TSA screeners to check over your electronics will no doubt be offset by Duluth's inclusion as a fully designated TSA Pre✓® airport.

Pavel Arkhipenkov

This week Student Views spotlights hurricane relief efforts at UMD. Elly Johnson from UMD Honors shares their effort to support medical assistance going to Puerto Rico.

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

Imagine having to to sit through classes with 95 different teachers before you find one that looks like you.

Imagine being a student of color and knowing that your chances of graduating high school were only 52 to 66 percent in Duluth -- but your guidance counselors each have 416 students to advise and help.

Imagine what you could do if Duluth had a universal scholarship program like one launched in Michigan ten years ago: one that would pay tuition to a state college for any student who graduates from the Duluth Public Schools. 

Duluth City Clerk

The League of Women Voters Duluth has all kinds of information available on their website for voters today.

The non-profit, non-partisan organization has everything from a Voter Guide to maps, instructions and links to more information.

To save you some time, we've added a few here:

Voter Guide

Duluth Precinct Maps

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.


Back in 1960, MnDOT built a chunk of Highway 53 on land owned by a mining company.

The only catch was, if the company wanted to get at the ore underneath the road, the road would have to be moved.

Fast forward 57 years and the road did indeed need to be moved, a project "cursed with a short timeline but blessed with resources."

Houston says he's not headed to Disneyland to celebrate the completion of the project ... but he is going to deer camp. 

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

Hopping on a bus because your car’s in the shop or you want to be environmentally responsible.

Cutting a rent or mortgage check at the first of the month so your family has a clean, safe home.

Picking up a group of friends or piling in your car with the family to head to the park for a day of fun.

For 75% of Duluthians, that’s everyday life.

But for the remaining 25%, the one in four families in this town who live in poverty, it’s not.

©John Krumm

Accountant and current Duluth City Councilor at Large Zack Filipovich weighs in on the challenges of finding a place to live in Duluth, the mayor's proposed sales tax increase to pay for street repair and what issues he finds most important.

We reached out to the campaign of Barb Russ but they did not respond to our requests for interviews.

Pavel Arkhipenkov

Student Views" connects you with the student experience at UMD, airing every other Monday on Northland Morning. This week host Pavel Arkhipenkov welcomes Han Zhang - Public Relations Director for the UMD Chinese Student and Scholar Association to the studio. Listen for more about the organization's mission, events and importance on campus. 

UMD Student organizations

If walls could talk ... Nopeming would probably have a lot to say.

Minnesota's first hospital for the care of tuberculosis patients opened in 1912 just outside of Duluth, and became a nursing home in the '50s before the place closed for good in 2002.

But the non-profit, Orison, that bought the abandoned facility in 2009 has been updating  security, and now they're ready to welcome the public: for tours, to film movies or to investigate the paranormal ...