Northland Morning Interviews

Lake Superior Zoo

"There were a number of lessons learned," remarks Erik Simonson, dryly.

Andrew M. Allen, US Army/Flickr

Minnesota's not prone to hurricanes like we've seen ravage Texas, Florida and parts south recently, but our cold winters bring their own dangers.

Like carbon monoxide poisoning.  10 to 20 deaths and over 50 hospitalizations happen every year thanks to gas stoves, furnaces, water heaters or any other kind of fuel-burning device that's not properly vented, maintained or installed.

And carbon monoxide detectors aren't just a good idea; they're the law.

We speak with Duluth City Councilor-at-Large Elissa Hansen.  She is the Chair of the Finance Committee and the writer of an award-winning grant that was submitted to the Knight Foundation for Imagine Canal Park. This award will be celebrated today with a free and open-to-the-public Community Launch Party from 4 to 7 p.m. in Canal Park.

© lettawren [modified, via Flickr]

We speak with Ellen Wiss, a member of the Voter Service Committee of the League of Women Voters in Duluth, who shares important information about tomorrow's primary election in Duluth, including who can vote, what seats are on the ballot, and when the polls open and close.

Leeann Cafferata [via Flickr]

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Jodi Slick, the founder and CEO of Ecolibrium3, about what it means to have a sustainable community, by improving social connectivity and creating local zoning plans that promote sustaining our regional ecosystem. 

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Tristen Eberling from Ecolibrium3 about the Giving Comfort at Home program.  Many of our neighbors in Duluth are living in energy poverty.  Deciding whether to “heat or eat” happens too often with our long winters and old housing stock.

As part of our Sustainability Week series on Northland Morning, we speak with Randy Hanson, PhD, the Co-Director of the Program in Environment and Sustainability at UMD about goings on at the UMD Land Lab, including their recently built "high tunnel" greenhouse, ongoing research in hydroponics, and the upcoming Farm Fest 2017 on September 17 at the UMD Sustainable Agriculture Project (SAP) Farm.

©Studio One Photography

If you have any doubts about Talia Martens' ability to race the 150 mile 2018 Jr. Iditarod, just look at her trainer/mentors: John Beargrease Sled Dog champion Jamie Nelson and Iditarod veteran Ryan Redington.

If you have any doubts about Talia Martens' tenacity to reach her goal - well, this is a girl who trains huskies in agility.

Maybe it's a little step, but for the first time, UMD's Music Department is sponsoring a recital of queer-identified faculty.

Derek Bromme, Elizabeth Fisher, Elias Mokole and Tom Hamilton of UWS are performing tonight at 7:30 at the Weber Music Hall in The Rainbow Connection Concert.

The translation of  Michael Perry's 2002 book,  Population 485, to a stage show at Big Top Chatauqua means he could invite all of New Auburn, Wisconsin and still have room left over under the big blue tent for, oh, Glen Haven.  Or Cary.

After a long time of mulling, re-reading and note-taking, Perry did the "heavy lifting" of preparing the script in Norb Blei's chicken coop over three days.  The resulting story is a clean, sparingly retold version of his memoir, without, as he puts it, "tacky drama" -- or one of his brothers.

Janice Liu

Back to school fills some kids with dread.

For them, the ringing of the class bell sounds like the bell that starts a boxing match - and here come the bullies.

New Moon Girls' back-to-school issue offers something a little different this year, though - not only nuts-and-bolts tools if you're seeing someone being bullied, but an approach you probably never thought of.

Loco Steve/Flickr

Getting from Point A to Point B is a big deal in Duluth.

There are a lot of options (walking, biking, public transportation, skiing) and a lot of challenges (weather, bike-friendly streets, access to transportation for folks without cars or with disabilities).

Aimee Foster from Community Action Duluth talks about their efforts to collect extra and unwanted apples for making Fruit Bits, a transitional employment program that turns otherwise unused apples into healthful and affordable fruit leathers sold at local stores.

Everyone is talking about the solar eclipse, occurring Monday across the north American continent.  In the Duluth area, it will not be total eclipse, a mere 80% coverage of the moon over the sun, but that is still a spectacular event to see.

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Funny they didn't offer a series of classes on "how to rehab old water-damaged buildings."

But there are plenty of treats in store for visitors to 1917 W Superior Street.

The new home of the Duluth Folk School will not only offer classroom space, in an effort to diversify and make the venture sustainable, they'll be renting out studio space (each with a skylight), offering a marketplace with locally handcrafted goods from instructors and tenants, and debuting The Dovetail Cafe.

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