Neonicotinoids

USFWS Mountain-Prairie/Flickr

The irony isn't lost on those who study these things.

Neonicotinoid pesticides were developed originally because they were thought to be less toxic to birds and wildlife than other options.  

The effects on pollinators are becoming widely examined  - and they're troubling - but now the MN DNR is into the third year of a study to see what happens to sharp-tailed grouse exposed to the chemicals.

And they're asking Minnesota grouse hunters to help them collect samples.

©Pat Thomas. Used with permission.

County Commissioner Frank Jewell isn't upset at all.

Despite the fact that he'd been pushing the St. Louis County Commission for six years to ban neonicotinoid pesticides and also to add bee- and butterfly friendly native plants, it wasn't until a group of citizens from the northern part of the county got behind the effort that things started to happen.

Lisa Johnson

You can even sing today's forecast if you want to: The sun'll come out ... tomorrow ...

So if you're ready to take advantage of a little sunshine and some warm temperatures for a change, Tom Kasper says maybe one of the many classes this spring on bee-friendly gardening has inspired you.

You can do everything from giving over your whole yard to pollinator-friendly plants or just do one thing: remember, when you buy plants, to make sure they have NOT been exposed to neonicotinoids.