Native American

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.

After their retirement from UMD, Tom and Betsy Peacock weren't the type of folks to kick back and do nothing.

They saw a need: for more children's books for Native kids and for Native authors and illustrators to have a way to get a foot in the door of the publishing world.

So they founded Black Bears & Blueberries Publishing.

Center of American Indian & Minority Health

Christian Coffman can't stop beaming, just thinking about the student who came into his class this summer admitting that many of the sciences were not his favorite subjects.

Coffman, a grad student in Chemistry at UMD was teaching some STEM courses this summer as part of the Center of Minority and Indian Health's Native Americans in Medicine program.

Marcia Anderson's fascinating, gorgeously illustrated book of the art of the Ojibwe bandolier bag had its genesis in a box she opened in 1981.

Courtney Celley/USFWS.

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we have a conversation with Dennis Jones about the 

Ojibwe language, naming ceremonies, offering tobacco and more. Jones recently retired from years as an Ojibwe language instructor at the University of Minnesota. He is a band member of Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation, located in the Treaty Three territory in northwestern Ontario.  He is the author of Daga Anishinaabemodaa: Let's Speak Ojibwe, an Ojibwe Word List and Phrase Book, illustrated by Aza Erdrich.

Originally aired 11/21/16

A rare screening of local animation is showing 7pm on Thursday July, 20 at Teatro Zuccone.  A collection of films by local artist Jonathan Thunder is an exciting part of his new exhibit “Peripheral Vignettes” at the Duluth Art Institute.  

_paVan_ (via Flickr, modified)

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we welcome back Nancy Jones, a respected elder from Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation near Fort Frances, Ontario. 

Originally aired 9/15/2016

Radio Gallery: Play

Jun 20, 2017
Rob Atoms

The Duluth Art Institute is opening two summer exhibits on June 29, "Peripheral Vignettes" a solo show of Jonathan Thunder's paintings, and "Play" a group multi-media show about games. 

There is a new exhibit called Sinew at the Tweed Museum of Art bringing together the work of celebrated and accomplished female Native artists living and working in the Twin Cities.  The show was curated by Dyani White Hawk and includes the work of Carolyn Anderson, Julie Buffalohead, Andrea Carlson, Elizabeth Day, Heid E. Erdrich, Louise Erdrich, and Maggie Thompson.

©First Nations Development Institute

Living in a food desert is bad enough - that's defined as an area vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas - but it's worse when you live 20 or 30 miles from the closest place that sells anything to eat at all.

IMDB

Richard Hansen might consider sending Jessica Chastain an invitation.

The Oscar-winning actress called for more women storytellers and filmmakers after serving as a judge at the Cannes Film Festival, and called the world's view of women through film "quite disturbing."

©Sue Brown Chapin

The Minnesota Percent for Art in Public Places program Thursday answers who, what, where, when, why and how questions about public art;  Sinew opens that evening at the Tweed Museum of Art and the Lakeside Art Gallery showcases the

Dick Thompson/Jay Smiley/Flickr

Navajo/Lakota psychiatrist Dr Melvina Bissonette on finding home thousands of miles from where she grew up, the need for native physicians and particularly psychiatrists in Indian Country, and the importance of holding your own with winter war stories.

Lisa Johnson

The suicide rate for Native kids is twice the rate of that for non-Natives.

With that terrifying number, how can tribal people encourage hope and resilience in young people when their lived experience is so different - and falls so short, many times - of what they see on television or online?

All over the country, and here in Minnesota, tribes are working hard to reconnect their young people with traditional teachings, the land, the natural world and with elders to restore their identify and reinvigorate their pride in who they are.

Additional Resources:

Pages