Native American

Zoongide'win (zoon GED eh win) means "strong-hearted" in Ojibwe, and it's also the title of an exhibition this week of maps, manuscripts and the resilience of the people who were here long before Europeans arrived.

Howl Arts Collective Montreal/Flickr

Duluth's ongoing conversation about Earned Safe and Sick Time is a critical one for people who risk their jobs if they take time off to care for a sick child or are seeking help in instances of domestic abuse.

In Duluth's Native American community, over 30% of the population is homeless.  80% of mothers are the primary breadwinners for their families. And 46% - compared to 26% of the general population here - are living below the poverty line.

So as you might imagine, issues surrounding income and job security - not to mention aid for victims of violence - are big deals.

©Dakota Wicohan

Sixth grade in Minnesota traditionally means a lot of learning about lakes and iron ore and Scandinavian immigrants, and usually there's a field trip to the State Capitol thrown in.

But the part of the state's history that deals with its first nations is either glossed over or skipped altogether, and in addition to leaving non-native students clueless about a large part of Minnesota's past - and a large part of our population - it makes Native students feel as though their experience has been erased.

©Reyna Crow. Used with permission.

When protestors and the news media began flooding the tiny town of Fort Yates, North Dakota in the spring of 2016, no one knew that the efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline would be so far-reaching.

Mark Holman is the director of the Sitting Bull College Library, and even a year later, he doesn't have a complete grasp on what happened in his small community.  What he does know, however, is that it's his job to assemble the bits and pieces and help make sense of it.

If families are the building blocks of a community, it makes sense to provide them with support and connectedness to other families.

National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC)

The folks at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center in Lame Deer, MT knew representatives from the movie Wind River would be coming to visit.

After all, they were shooting a new TV series, Yellowstone, nearby and had promised to help host a fundraiser.

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

The boarding school era for Native American children in America began with the opening of the Carlisle School in 1879. It was considered a more "merciful" solution to what was then thought of as "the Indian problem." 

It continued until the passage of the Indian Child Welfare act in 1978, when Native parents finally gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.

On this Thanksgiving Day, Sioux (Oglala Lakota) chef Sean Sherman is being treated by his family.

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.

After their retirement from UMD, Tom and Betsy Peacock weren't the type of folks to kick back and do nothing.

They saw a need: for more children's books for Native kids and for Native authors and illustrators to have a way to get a foot in the door of the publishing world.

So they founded Black Bears & Blueberries Publishing.

Listen as Linda Legarde Grover introduces her new book, "Onigamiising Seasons of an Ojibwe Year" and talks about the significance. 

Onigamiising in Ojibwe translates to, "the place of the small portage," which refers to the strip of land separating the bay and harbor near Park Point. 

Linda had written small excerpts about seasons and met with editors to create this novel.

Center of American Indian & Minority Health

Christian Coffman can't stop beaming, just thinking about the student who came into his class this summer admitting that many of the sciences were not his favorite subjects.

Coffman, a grad student in Chemistry at UMD was teaching some STEM courses this summer as part of the Center of Minority and Indian Health's Native Americans in Medicine program.

Marcia Anderson's fascinating, gorgeously illustrated book of the art of the Ojibwe bandolier bag had its genesis in a box she opened in 1981.

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