Native American

A rare screening of local animation is showing 7pm on Thursday July, 20 at Teatro Zuccone.  A collection of films by local artist Jonathan Thunder is an exciting part of his new exhibit “Peripheral Vignettes” at the Duluth Art Institute.  

Radio Gallery: Play

Jun 20, 2017
Rob Atoms

The Duluth Art Institute is opening two summer exhibits on June 29, "Peripheral Vignettes" a solo show of Jonathan Thunder's paintings, and "Play" a group multi-media show about games. 

There is a new exhibit called Sinew at the Tweed Museum of Art bringing together the work of celebrated and accomplished female Native artists living and working in the Twin Cities.  The show was curated by Dyani White Hawk and includes the work of Carolyn Anderson, Julie Buffalohead, Andrea Carlson, Elizabeth Day, Heid E. Erdrich, Louise Erdrich, and Maggie Thompson.

©First Nations Development Institute

Living in a food desert is bad enough - that's defined as an area vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas - but it's worse when you live 20 or 30 miles from the closest place that sells anything to eat at all.

IMDB

Richard Hansen might consider sending Jessica Chastain an invitation.

The Oscar-winning actress called for more women storytellers and filmmakers after serving as a judge at the Cannes Film Festival, and called the world's view of women through film "quite disturbing."

©Sue Brown Chapin

The Minnesota Percent for Art in Public Places program Thursday answers who, what, where, when, why and how questions about public art;  Sinew opens that evening at the Tweed Museum of Art and the Lakeside Art Gallery showcases the

Dick Thompson/Jay Smiley/Flickr

Navajo/Lakota psychiatrist Dr Melvina Bissonette on finding home thousands of miles from where she grew up, the need for native physicians and particularly psychiatrists in Indian Country, and the importance of holding your own with winter war stories.

Lisa Johnson

The suicide rate for Native kids is twice the rate of that for non-Natives.

With that terrifying number, how can tribal people encourage hope and resilience in young people when their lived experience is so different - and falls so short, many times - of what they see on television or online?

All over the country, and here in Minnesota, tribes are working hard to reconnect their young people with traditional teachings, the land, the natural world and with elders to restore their identify and reinvigorate their pride in who they are.

Additional Resources:

http://www.duluthmn.gov

The process to rename Lake Place Park Gichi 'ode Akiing (gih chee o DAY  ah king) or "Grand Heart Place" and  in so doing, recognize the Native community's long presence in what's now called Duluth continues.

Babette Sandman is the chair of the Duluth Indigenous Commission and she has big dreams for the project, including a naming ceremony that would bring all nations together, and opportunities for teachings and new beginnings.

Sam Moose is really excited about the re-opening of the new Four Winds addiction treatment center.

For one thing, the program's focus on traditional Native American teachings and traditions is the only one of it's kind in Minnesota.

For another, the band took over operation and management of the center March 1st after the state wanted to close it due to budget issues.

And Moose, the band's Commissioner of Health, isn't the only tribal member excited about the program.  The entire community is lining up to help, apply for jobs and volunteer.

KUMD is saddened by the passing of Larry Smallwood [Amik], a longtime contributor to our program Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa.  We send our thoughts and condolences to his family, and to the many people in the community who benefited from his wisdom and guidance.  Amik grew up in Aazhoomoog, the Lake Lena District of Mille Lacs, and served as the director of language and culture for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.  He also taught Ojibwe language at many institutions, including UMD.

Tribal members of the Lower Sioux Indian Community were frustrated with the lack of cultural awareness when it came to their health care and by a "fragmented" system that made it hard to track native health concerns.

But they had hope that they could create better access to care by opening their own clinic ... and also create employment opportunities beyond casino jobs.

Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

Wild rice is the Minnesota state grain and this week MN Sea Grant host Jesse Schomberg welcomes UMD professor John Pastor to share his recent research about sulfide effects on wild rice.  Listen for more about the details of his findings and the future use of his work with sulfate and sulfides.

Maybe "prophet" is too strong a word to describe Larry Stillday.

Maybe "prescient" is a better one.

When Larry Stillday died in May of 2014, he left behind a legacy as a spiritual teacher.  Michael Meuers, a non-Native who worked for the Red Lake Band for over 20 years, found Stillday so poetic he just started writing down the things he said.

And at this time in history, Meuers says, Stillday's teachings, especially about the need to assimilate more with the "culture of the land," are even more important.

It's not easy to admit you're using drugs.

Especially if you're pregnant.

Nor is getting off drugs, especially if you're pregnant, when "cold turkey" withdrawal can put the unborn baby through withdrawal, too.

That's where the M.O.M.s program on the White Earth Nation comes in: a program to help expecting mothers get off drugs, and support them medically, emotionally, psychologically and culturally.

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