Native American

Carl Gawboy

Niiyo-wiij-anishinaabeg or four friends, a new show in The Depot Great Hall, has opened and is up through July 24.  Minnesota artists George Morrison, Joe Geshick and Carl Gawboy each took different artistic paths with their work but their journeys as leading Ojibwe artists in the 20th century brought them together. They welcome you on this journey with them, as the fourth friend.

(l to r) Professor Terresa Hardaway (Outstanding Achievement in Academic Equality), Rachel Goodsky (Community Award for Leadership and Service) and D’Andre Robinson (Youth Leader of Excellence 2018)Credit ©Ivy VainioEdit | Remove

A teacher and business woman who is a mentor and role model for young girls.  

An Anishinabe advocate for women's rights, helping to build confidence in young women and offering support to those seeking sobriety.

Michele Beeksma recently gave a talk at the Duluth Depot titled, “Understanding Chippewa 1854 Treaty Rights in Northeast Minnesota, 1854 to the Present.” She discussed past events and individuals related to the 1854 Treaty and examined the legal and cultural viewpoints of how people are currently implementing their treaty rights.

©John Krumm

Four Native American doctors graduated from UMD's Medical School at the beginning of May.

Arne Vainio

"In the Spirit of Medicine" is a new feature on Northland Morning, airing for the first time Monday, May 14 at 8:00am.

Zoongide'win (zoon GED eh win) means "strong-hearted" in Ojibwe, and it's also the title of an exhibition this week of maps, manuscripts and the resilience of the people who were here long before Europeans arrived.

Howl Arts Collective Montreal/Flickr

Duluth's ongoing conversation about Earned Safe and Sick Time is a critical one for people who risk their jobs if they take time off to care for a sick child or are seeking help in instances of domestic abuse.

In Duluth's Native American community, over 30% of the population is homeless.  80% of mothers are the primary breadwinners for their families. And 46% - compared to 26% of the general population here - are living below the poverty line.

So as you might imagine, issues surrounding income and job security - not to mention aid for victims of violence - are big deals.

©Dakota Wicohan

Sixth grade in Minnesota traditionally means a lot of learning about lakes and iron ore and Scandinavian immigrants, and usually there's a field trip to the State Capitol thrown in.

But the part of the state's history that deals with its first nations is either glossed over or skipped altogether, and in addition to leaving non-native students clueless about a large part of Minnesota's past - and a large part of our population - it makes Native students feel as though their experience has been erased.

©Reyna Crow. Used with permission.

When protestors and the news media began flooding the tiny town of Fort Yates, North Dakota in the spring of 2016, no one knew that the efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline would be so far-reaching.

Mark Holman is the director of the Sitting Bull College Library, and even a year later, he doesn't have a complete grasp on what happened in his small community.  What he does know, however, is that it's his job to assemble the bits and pieces and help make sense of it.

If families are the building blocks of a community, it makes sense to provide them with support and connectedness to other families.

National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC)

The folks at the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center in Lame Deer, MT knew representatives from the movie Wind River would be coming to visit.

After all, they were shooting a new TV series, Yellowstone, nearby and had promised to help host a fundraiser.

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

The boarding school era for Native American children in America began with the opening of the Carlisle School in 1879. It was considered a more "merciful" solution to what was then thought of as "the Indian problem." 

It continued until the passage of the Indian Child Welfare act in 1978, when Native parents finally gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.

On this Thanksgiving Day, Sioux (Oglala Lakota) chef Sean Sherman is being treated by his family.

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.

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