MN Reads

Immigrants. Working-class people who feel they have no voice. Jobs.

Labor historian Gary Kaunonen talks about the conversations then and now ... and why he thinks  history - for everyone - should be a basic human right.

Art historian and host of Where's Art, Annie Dugan, takes the mic to interview Andreas Marks, the author of Hard Bodies: Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture.

National Geographic photographer, collaborator and dad Per Breiehagen talks about the latest entry in the "Wish" series, their photo shoot at Wintergreen Dogsled Lodge in Ely for next year's book, and why you never know when photos from the archive are going to come in handy.

Insights can come from unexpected places.

After a career in academia, publishing and lecturing on fairy tales, Jack Zipes hardly expected his 3,000-picture postcard collection to yield new insights.

But it did: over five pounds worth.

"That's the point of any kind of travel, really. That it's transformational.  You become part of the world in a way that you weren't before."

~ Thomas Shevory

On this Thanksgiving Day, Sioux (Oglala Lakota) chef Sean Sherman is being treated by his family.

Dr. Carter Meland joins us today to discuss his book, "Stories for a Lost Child" and about discovering heritage and finding the community.

As a girl receives a mysterious package, she questions who she is and why her mom has kept this from her. Could this package hold the answers that she is looking for? Join her journey and see what the box holds for her.

After their retirement from UMD, Tom and Betsy Peacock weren't the type of folks to kick back and do nothing.

They saw a need: for more children's books for Native kids and for Native authors and illustrators to have a way to get a foot in the door of the publishing world.

So they founded Black Bears & Blueberries Publishing.

The art of being in the "once upon a time" and in the "now" simultaneously, why you need the best of your humanity to defeat a troll, and why no Norwegian child ever wants to be called "a troll-kid."

Listen as Linda Legarde Grover introduces her new book, "Onigamiising Seasons of an Ojibwe Year" and talks about the significance. 

Onigamiising in Ojibwe translates to, "the place of the small portage," which refers to the strip of land separating the bay and harbor near Park Point. 

Linda had written small excerpts about seasons and met with editors to create this novel.

Listen to Beth Dooley talk about food, and it's easy to understand how quickly you forget that it's food she's talking about.

Art, architecture and culture flow into this story of the creation of a terrazzo floor; a creation, ultimately, to be stepped into, not just stepped upon.

Margi Preus talks about the "reverse strip tease" of mystery writing and why she never gets more confident as a writer.

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