Migration

Flickr/ Vicki DeLoach

Who is that happy bearded man sitting in a patch of goldenrod?

Chances are, it's author and naturalist Larry Weber.

(Oh, and don't get him started on goldenrod being blamed for the allergens of ragweed!)

Mario Klingemann/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks spiderwebs, continues to defend goldenrod from its undeserved reputation as an allergen, and warns against eating baneberry: "it is a bit nasty."

MagnoliaWarbler
Flickr // hjhipster

Skip work today.  Play hooky.

That's the word from Backyard Almanac's naturalist, educator and radio host, Larry Weber.

There are 26 species of warblers to identify, yellow lady slipper orchids to go in search of, red-winged blackbirds and black-winged red birds to enjoy, and "in addition to that", it's "toad time."

It took January, February, March and April to produce as much moisture as May has in two weeks.  Author, naturalist and educator Larry Weber tells us the difference it's making with the local flora and fauna.

Flickr/ Todd Pierson

Author and naturalist Larry Weber celebrated what he called Awesome, Adventurous April with a thundershower, a boom in migration and the biggest surprise: a leopard frog out and about on his lake.

http://mn.gov/indianaffairs/

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Larry Amik Smallwood talks about the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, including migration to the area, treaties, and histories of some of the ceremonial drums.

 

11/18 Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa - History of the Mille Lacs Band

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