Migration

Vincent Fournier/TBWA Paris

Larry Weber says there are four ways to survive winter:

  1. Migrate
  2. Hibernate
  3.  Remain active
  4. Lay eggs and die

Fritz Flohr Reynolds/Flickr

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

nancybeetoo (via Flickr)

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber notes how the late summer rains have brought an abundance of mushrooms. Glowworms have been out and about.  The trees are starting to change color as fall moves in, and with fall comes the migration of birds – some say the greatest in recent memory.  Both raptors (hawks, eagles) and non-raptors (Canada geese, warblers and blue jays, et al.) have been sighted. Snakes too!

Gavin Schaefer/Flickr

Laura Erickson says no one who knows anything about real nighthawks would ever consider naming their sports team after them ... but Larry Weber has enjoyed watching their migration this week, anyway.

Plus he's been watching hawks migrate at Hawk Ridge,  thrilled to the hundreds of spider webs that showed up so clearly with foggy dewdrops on them and, of course, spent time appreciating "the fungus among us" after the rains.

Thorsburg Photography

Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory has been counting migrants on the ridge for two weeks already, the sun is setting before 8pm and reds and yellows are popping up in all kinds of trees and bushes.

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says goodbye to August and hello to autumn.

Flickr/ Vicki DeLoach

Who is that happy bearded man sitting in a patch of goldenrod?

Chances are, it's author and naturalist Larry Weber.

(Oh, and don't get him started on goldenrod being blamed for the allergens of ragweed!)

Mario Klingemann/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks spiderwebs, continues to defend goldenrod from its undeserved reputation as an allergen, and warns against eating baneberry: "it is a bit nasty."

MagnoliaWarbler
Flickr // hjhipster

Skip work today.  Play hooky.

That's the word from Backyard Almanac's naturalist, educator and radio host, Larry Weber.

There are 26 species of warblers to identify, yellow lady slipper orchids to go in search of, red-winged blackbirds and black-winged red birds to enjoy, and "in addition to that", it's "toad time."

It took January, February, March and April to produce as much moisture as May has in two weeks.  Author, naturalist and educator Larry Weber tells us the difference it's making with the local flora and fauna.

Flickr/ Todd Pierson

Author and naturalist Larry Weber celebrated what he called Awesome, Adventurous April with a thundershower, a boom in migration and the biggest surprise: a leopard frog out and about on his lake.

http://mn.gov/indianaffairs/

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa, Larry Amik Smallwood talks about the history of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, including migration to the area, treaties, and histories of some of the ceremonial drums.

 

11/18 Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa - History of the Mille Lacs Band

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