Migration

Lisa Johnson

A year ago today, Duluth broke the record high temperature with 64 degrees.

Today, the National Weather Service reports a new low temperature for November 10 with -5.

If you don't decide to make tracks somewhere warmer, Larry Weber says you should get outside and LOOK AT tracks.

©Lisa Johnson

Spiders ballooning, raptors migrating, some lingering butterflies and the World Series moths fluttering ...

And all this before Larry Weber's favorite season of aut-win!

©Tara Smith, Wildwoods. Used with permission.

A couple of sick, skinny peregrine falcons have been brought into Wildwoods Wildlife Rehabilitation recently ... one didn't live to be transported to The Raptor Center but the one pictured at left did.

©Sparky Stensaas. Used with permission.

"I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw." ~ Wm. Shakespeare, "Hamlet"

Whether or not Hamlet had spent any time at Hawk Ridge is a question for another time, but experienced birders know a northwesterly wind is best for seeing birds at what has become an internationally-recognized place to see migration.

Between the fall wildflowers, the 45 different kinds of goldenrod that grow in Minnesota and the blackberries, suffice it to say that when he's out driving, Larry Weber's attention is everywhere BUT the road!

United States map showing locations where hummingbirds have been seen so far
Hummingbird.net

This morning, Laura Erickson drew our attention to this cool map - a Ruby-throated hummingbird ETA, of sorts.   You can find out more here:

And you can listen to Laura's show from this morning here:

Chrissine Cairns Rios/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 9, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

Brenda Dobbs/Flickr

A thousand hawks migrating over Hawk Ridge, the leaves changing color - those are signs of the season that are easy to see.  But Larry Weber says if you're paying attention, you can find things like eyelash fungus on downed logs and something called pinwheel fungus that he's seen sprout out of a single pine needle!

This weekend's forecast calls for sunny skies and 45 degrees on Saturday ... and clouds, a 50/50 chance of snow and a high of 20 on Sunday.

And that, says Larry Weber, is March in a nutshell.

Hawk Ridge draws hundreds of visitors every fall to watch the raptors migrating south.  But where do they end up?

Vincent Fournier/TBWA Paris

Larry Weber says there are four ways to survive winter:

  1. Migrate
  2. Hibernate
  3.  Remain active
  4. Lay eggs and die

Fritz Flohr Reynolds/Flickr

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

nancybeetoo (via Flickr)

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber notes how the late summer rains have brought an abundance of mushrooms. Glowworms have been out and about.  The trees are starting to change color as fall moves in, and with fall comes the migration of birds – some say the greatest in recent memory.  Both raptors (hawks, eagles) and non-raptors (Canada geese, warblers and blue jays, et al.) have been sighted. Snakes too!

Gavin Schaefer/Flickr

Laura Erickson says no one who knows anything about real nighthawks would ever consider naming their sports team after them ... but Larry Weber has enjoyed watching their migration this week, anyway.

Plus he's been watching hawks migrate at Hawk Ridge,  thrilled to the hundreds of spider webs that showed up so clearly with foggy dewdrops on them and, of course, spent time appreciating "the fungus among us" after the rains.

Thorsburg Photography

Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory has been counting migrants on the ridge for two weeks already, the sun is setting before 8pm and reds and yellows are popping up in all kinds of trees and bushes.

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says goodbye to August and hello to autumn.

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