Larry Weber

Every year, on the last Backyard Almanac of December, Larry Weber makes a request that has nothing to do phenology or the natural world: he just wants to hear John McCutcheon's song, "Christmas in the Trenches."  So this year, we decided to make some additional information about the song - and the story behind it - clickable for other fans.

Larry Weber's renamed the season: "Desummber." 

Brian Moran/Flickr

Disappointed in the weather?

Larry Weber says turn your eyes to the skies instead.

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Naturalist Larry Weber continues to hold out hope for what he calls a "healthy November" ... his heart soars with each freeze, but plummets again with each thaw.  So far, November is averaging about ten degrees above normal.

Vincent Fournier/TBWA Paris

Larry Weber says there are four ways to survive winter:

  1. Migrate
  2. Hibernate
  3.  Remain active
  4. Lay eggs and die

 Tracks in the Wild, a Minnesota Book Award winner in 1994, has been reissued by the University of Minnesota Press.

Turns out, it's a perfect companion to Larry Weber's Backyard Almanac, and its author/illustrator, Northland gem Betsy Bowen, shares his passion for getting outdoors to see what's what.

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

No frost, no ice,
No snow, no cold

November!

- adapted for November 2015 by Larry Weber, with apologies to Thomas Hood!

Erin Welch

Who knew November was one of the best months for seeing the aurora?  Just another reason to love Larry Weber and Backyard Almanac! 

Thorsburg Photography

Larry Weber continues to extoll the virtues of aut-win, his name for the time of year after the leaves are off the trees but before the snow falls. 

And he reminds us that after this weekend, sunset will be coming a lot sooner.

lisa johnson/thorsburg photography

Larry Weber shares the perfect poem to describe our recent weather.

Thorsburg Photography

This week's wind and rain resulted in the big leaf drop Larry Weber's been predicting ... but it's also made for a good week at Hawk Ridge with over a thousand raptors migrating through.

Fritz Flohr Reynolds/Flickr

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Larry says we had the third warmest September on record ... and that's good news for late season wildflowers like the New England Aster.

Bryan Garnett-Law/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says with the coming of the autumnal equinox, living things start thinking ahead to how they will cope with the coming winter.

There are four methods: which one/s will you employ?

Anita Ritenour

Author and naturalist Larry Weber observes the final week of summer, noting the warmer temps (10 degrees above average for September!).  The leaves are already starting to change: Maples, sumacs, dogwoods are turning red, but so are Virginia creeper and poison ivy. Yellow leaves to look out for are the ash, birch and poplar trees. Birds are migrating – this is "hawk weekend" in the Duluth area.  Geese and cranes are in motion, as are the warblers, thrushes and flickers, among others. 

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