Larry Weber

Gabriel F.W. Koch [via Flickr]

Even though the fog and cloud cover over the past few days have blocked our ability to see the Perseid meteor showers, the fog has highlighted spider webs beautifully. 

Lisa Johnson

Folks in Larry Weber's Minnesota Master Naturalist class don't sit around the campfire telling scary stories ... they go out after dusk looking for spiders and spider webs instead.

©Christopher Harwood

"And when you smile for the camera
I know I'll love you better...."

~ Peg, written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen

Larry Weber says recent rains have resulted in a wealth of "photogenic mushrooms," wildflowers are everywhere you look (learn more about the story behind the name of Joe-Pye weeds here) and everything from scarlet tanagers to summer frogs to the full moon are out to catch your eyes and ears.

Back in 1936 over a ten day period in July, Duluth set seven record high temperatures that still stand - including 106 on July 13.

And that was back in the days when they took the temperature readings down by the lake.

Uff-da.

Bird eggs hatching
Lisa Johnson

Fireflies are out, so are baby mammals, insects, and the things that eat insects.

And Larry Weber says July is the month of fledglings.

© Windslash (via flickr)

Last-minute spring rainstorms ushered in our first week of summer.  Animals are busy: fireflies are out, some breeding birds are beginning their second brood, particularly robins and phoebes. Gray tree fogs are still making noise, and summer will also bring the calls of mink frogs and green frogs.  Turtles, butterflies and some cicadas are emerging as well.

J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Larry Weber joins us from northeastern Nebraska this morning.  500 miles south of Duluth,  the berries that are just blooming here are ripe there.  In other words ... Larry is joining us from summer.

The Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union

Chances are Larry Weber is keeping paper records - he's old-school like that - but he's been a busy fellow regardless this week.

For more information on the Minnesota DNR's breeding bird survey, start here

For more information on the Minnesota Frog and Toad Calling Survey (there are even recordings you can listen to!), click here.

Larry Weber on our rainy season: two-thirds of all the precipitation we get comes between May and September ... and most of that comes in June.

©lisa johnson/Thorsburg Photography

    Less than half the normal amount of rain for May this year?

  But is it really fair to make up the deficit over a holiday weekend??

Matt Stratmoen/Flickr

Larry runs down the numbers for us on our cooler-than-usual May so far ... and he and Laura Erickson were charmed by the same bird this week.

ashoutofdoors.blogspot.com

Larry Weber spent the week teaching a Master Naturalist class at the Boulder Lake Environmental Learning Center and trekking his students into the woods to see spring ephemerals, warblers, budding trees and mosquitos - the larval and pupal forms thereof.

Teresa Boardman/Flickr

Tra-la!  It's May!  And Larry Weber reports the spring ephemerals are in full bloom and Jay Cooke State Park is the place to see them.

Michael Kensinger, Jeff Hahn

For the first time in 14 months - since February 2015 - we've had a month that's cooler than normal.

Ian Griffiths/Flickr

Frogs are calling, red maples are flowering, painted turtles are crowding logs to bask in the (scarce) sun ... 

and it's raining and cold.  Again.

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