Larry Weber

Carron Brown/Flickr

The leaves have turned, snowshoe hares are turning and clocks will be turned this weekend.

October's Bright Blue Weather

When comrades seek sweet country haunts,
        By twos and twos together,
    And count like misers, hour by hour,
        October's bright blue weather.

O suns and skies and flowers of June,
        Count all your boasts together,
    Love loveth best of all the year
        October's bright blue weather.

         ~Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885)

©Lisa Johnson

Spiders ballooning, raptors migrating, some lingering butterflies and the World Series moths fluttering ...

And all this before Larry Weber's favorite season of aut-win!

©Tara Smith, Wildwoods. Used with permission.

A couple of sick, skinny peregrine falcons have been brought into Wildwoods Wildlife Rehabilitation recently ... one didn't live to be transported to The Raptor Center but the one pictured at left did.

©Sparky Stensaas. Used with permission.

"I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw." ~ Wm. Shakespeare, "Hamlet"

Whether or not Hamlet had spent any time at Hawk Ridge is a question for another time, but experienced birders know a northwesterly wind is best for seeing birds at what has become an internationally-recognized place to see migration.

© Dorian [via Flickr]

Larry Weber, educator, author and naturalist, talks about his observations in nature this week, including light from the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies, and from glowworms who are feeding before they bed down for winter.  Despite the warm temps of late the fall foliage is showing some brilliant yellows and reds.  Larry has seen woolly bear caterpillars and an eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly.  The fog yesterday also provided a brilliant showing of spider webs. 

© Superior National Forest [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes the terrific autumnal conditions this morning, including aerial spider webs in the trees, bird migrations (robins, Canada geese, crows, flickers, warblers, et al.), young coyotes, newly-independent fawns, and butterflies.  Rainfall totals are the 13th highest on record (dating back to 18701), five inches above normal.  Wasps and hornets are gathering on goldenrod as they start to seek winter homes.  Late blooms include sunflowers, aster. Blackberries are still on hand, and the first phase of fall leaves are beginning to appear.

Between the fall wildflowers, the 45 different kinds of goldenrod that grow in Minnesota and the blackberries, suffice it to say that when he's out driving, Larry Weber's attention is everywhere BUT the road!

©Sparky Stensaas. Used with permission.

Special guest star Sparky Stensaas sits in for Larry Weber this morning, and talks about one of Larry's favorite plants: the much-maligned goldenrod.

For one thing, Larry says most people aren't allergic to goldenrod; they're allergic to ragweed.

Jared Smith [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes that so many things are happening in nature this week, from the mushrooms down low to the ground all the way up to the Perseids and the upcoming solar eclipse.  The rainfall totals for August (and the summer) are above normal. The hawks and ospreys will soon be on the move over Duluth, many insects are maturing, and the blackberries are ripening too.

Eclipse 2017/NASA

Larry Weber says the difference between viewing a total eclipse and a partial eclipse is - literally - the difference between night and day.

But if a trip to the totality isn't in your plans, there are lots of ways to enjoy the eclipse, stay safe and even a helpful list of places who might be able to set you up with good eclipse-viewing optics.

Goddard Science Visualization Studio, NASA

First, we've got a full moon August 7.  Then the Perseid meteor shower August 11-13.

Then the "eclipse of the century" on August 21, 2017.

No wonder Larry Weber thinks August is awesome!

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Larry Weber's already looking forward to what he calls "Awesome August," but he's not done enjoying the cricket-sized little spring peepers, wood frogs and American toads yet, either.

And milkweed and fireweed, he says, "own July."

liz west [Via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about his many finds this week, including Indian pipe (thriving in shady woods), basswood trees that are in bloom, mushrooms, and Queen Anne's Lace, blooming in northwestern Wisconsin.  Many songbirds are quieting down now that the fledglings are leaving the nest, although goldfinches are only now starting to nest.  Young frogs are maturing, fawns and bear cubs are out exploring with their mothers, and masses of mayflies are emerging to briefly breed before they die.

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