Larry Weber

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Larry Weber's already looking forward to what he calls "Awesome August," but he's not done enjoying the cricket-sized little spring peepers, wood frogs and American toads yet, either.

And milkweed and fireweed, he says, "own July."

liz west [Via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about his many finds this week, including Indian pipe (thriving in shady woods), basswood trees that are in bloom, mushrooms, and Queen Anne's Lace, blooming in northwestern Wisconsin.  Many songbirds are quieting down now that the fledglings are leaving the nest, although goldfinches are only now starting to nest.  Young frogs are maturing, fawns and bear cubs are out exploring with their mothers, and masses of mayflies are emerging to briefly breed before they die.

Courtney Celley/USFWS

Duluth set an all-time record for heat back on July 13th, 1936 (106 degrees - down by the lake, mind you)  but this year (yesterday) we barely crept to 57 degrees.

Berries and flowers and mushrooms, oh my - and let us not forget milkweed.

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

Temps like we've had the past few days remind us Duluth almost never gets hot.

But Larry Weber reminds us that 81 years ago, Duluth had a seven-day stretch of temperatures in the 90s or hotter, and three times the mercury hit 100 or above.

And if that's not bad enough, back in 1936, they were taking temperatures down by the lake.  Seriously.

©Friends of the Sax-Zim Bog

Even though the second half of the month was cooler than the first half, we still wound up with a slightly-warmer-than-normal June.

Add an inch more precipitation than usual (especially when places to the west of us are suffering through a drought), a few mushrooms and a bunch of butterflies and Larry Weber is a happy man!

Marilylle Soveran/Flickr

They brighten the roadsides at this time of year, but a lot of the flowers we're seeing along the highways and byways these days are actually non-native species.

Chris Evans [via flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber say this period just prior to the summer solstice gives us the earliest sunrises of the year, even though not yet the longest days.  In this first week of June, the rainfall total so far this month is lower than normal.  We are now near the end of bird migration.  Many blooming flowers, including lilacs, are in fine form this week as well.

jimflix!/Flickr

For the first time in over a year, a month averaged cooler than normal temperatures.

As May splashed  off in its yellow rain boots, June burst on the scene yesterday with a high temperature of 79: perfect for enjoying apple blossoms, baby birds, frog calls and mostly mosquito-free conditions.

For the first time in over a year, we have a month - May - where the temperature was cooler than normal.

But if anyone can find the silver lining in a cool, wet May, it would be Larry Weber.

Guy Sander (used with permission)

Larry Weber says the 2 1/2 inches of rain at his place this week means things are greening almost visibly.

Fiddlehead ferns that were just poking their heads from the soil last week are knee-high now, and if you have the time and patience, you'll be rewarded with good views of warblers.

In addition, Larry says he heard a visitor he hasn't heard at his place in over 20 years.

Jack Pearce [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about these mid-May mornings that are "beyond description" with so much happening as nature awakes.  Also, because leaves have not fully grown out yet, it is a greater opportunity to see both flora in fauna as you explore the woods of northern Minnesota.

This week's warmup has spring things bustin' out all over, from frogs calling to dragonfly and spider web sightings, to new migrants, spring wildflowers and white pelicans hanging out on the St. Louis River before they head north.

Lisa Johnson

April is unpredictable, says Larry Weber.  It went along predictably enough, lulling us into a false sense of security and then, predictably, it became ... unpredictable.

We're finally caught up on moisture for the month; yes, snow in April is "normal;" we'll have 14 hours of daylight come Sunday and the white pelicans have returned to the St. Louis River.

April's first half is running about six degrees warmer than usual ... the greening has begun ... and you can hear the early spring trio (chorus frogs, spring peepers and wood frogs) around the Northland.

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