goldenrod

© Superior National Forest [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes the terrific autumnal conditions this morning, including aerial spider webs in the trees, bird migrations (robins, Canada geese, crows, flickers, warblers, et al.), young coyotes, newly-independent fawns, and butterflies.  Rainfall totals are the 13th highest on record (dating back to 18701), five inches above normal.  Wasps and hornets are gathering on goldenrod as they start to seek winter homes.  Late blooms include sunflowers, aster. Blackberries are still on hand, and the first phase of fall leaves are beginning to appear.

©Sparky Stensaas. Used with permission.

Special guest star Sparky Stensaas sits in for Larry Weber this morning, and talks about one of Larry's favorite plants: the much-maligned goldenrod.

For one thing, Larry says most people aren't allergic to goldenrod; they're allergic to ragweed.

©Friends of the Sax-Zim Bog

Even though the second half of the month was cooler than the first half, we still wound up with a slightly-warmer-than-normal June.

Add an inch more precipitation than usual (especially when places to the west of us are suffering through a drought), a few mushrooms and a bunch of butterflies and Larry Weber is a happy man!

Bill Damon/Flickr

Larry Weber is perhaps the only person to get distracted from the pursuit of blackberries, just to watch insects enjoying goldenrod.