Gardening

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Back in the day, you had to work in the garden if you wanted to eat.

Then many folks (perhaps justifiably) began enjoying the convenience of fruits and veggies (canned, frozen or fresh) from the grocery store.

Master gardener Tom Kasper says the pendulum is swinging back again toward folks growing their own food, but he says the attitude now is that people get to garden; they don't have to.

Despite a gardening career that spans decades, author John Whitman says he thought he knew more than he did when he sat down to produce Fresh From The Garden: An Organic Guide to Growing Vegetables, Berries and Herbs in Cold Climates.

Sharon Mollerus [via Flickr]

Weeds are smarter than we think they are, says Tom Kasper. They blend in with surrounding vegetation and grow very fast. 

In the warm and often drier month of August, Tom reminds us to keep our gardens watered and weeded. Fruits and vegetables are starting to ripen, so keeping them fed and free of competition will help ensure they finish the summer healthy.  Stay vigilant.

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How many gardeners does it take to change a bulb?

Master gardener Tom Kasper talks bulbs, squirrels and what he calls "the long view into happiness."

Ears of sweet corn
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Tom Kasper talks about garden tasks other than harvesting and preserving that we can be doing this time of year to prepare for next year's growing season.  He also shared tips for growing sweet corn successfully in our Northern climate.

Distant Hill Gardens/Flickr

"Uvularia grandiflora" (Large-Flowered Bellwort or merrybells), "Uvularia sessilifolia" (Sessile-leafBellwort) and "Trientalis borealis"  (Starflower) are just a few of the Latin names for spring ephemerals*   that Carol Andrews says we can grow at home.  Don't know much about spring ephemerals?  She recommends spending more time lying down in the woods.  Carol Andrews is the president of the Wild Ones Minnesota Arrowhead Chapter.

* from the Greek ephēmeros  "lasting a day."

Pupparazzi - Companion Animal Photography

Master Gardener Tom Kasper says we can use the rainy/snowy cool days expected for this week to gently remove the remains of last year's perennials from the new emerging shoots.  And he says we can use rotten-egg-smelling sprays and blood or bone meal to repel/terrify deer and squirrels from ever returning to our yards!

Master gardener Tom Kasper salutes the potato as the vegetable of the year, and gives a rundown of some important calendar events for 2015.