Feminism

FEmnFest

Abigail Mlinar and Brittany Lind, organizers of Duluth's newest festival FEmnFEST, joined Christine Dean to talk about what inspired this unapologetically feminist festival. They talked about why they felt it was needed and about the music and workshops that will be featured during this three-day event.

Find out more about the festival

The wave of grassroots feminist organizing that built beginning in the late '70s had its origin in some unlikely places.

Women who immigrated to America from Finland - some of whom came alone - had had the right to vote since 1906, and they got right to work organizing and publishing a feminist newspaper.

The Anishinaabe had a long woman-centric tradition until the advent of the boarding schools, where women were honored in the society.

And then there's the lake and the wilderness. "It draws certain kinds of people," says author Beth Bartlett.  "It's restorative."

©Laura Lundin

Last December, local television reporter and news anchor Michelle Lee retired after almost 40 years as a broadcaster.  Within a few weeks, she boarded a bus with a crowd of other Northlanders and headed for Washington DC.

Never one to miss a chance to stretch KUMD’s budget with volunteers, I asked Michelle if she’d mind capturing some audio and doing some interviews for us on the trip, and she graciously consented, then joined me in the studio to talk about the trip. 

Grassroots Feminism

Mar 2, 2017
Beth Bartlett

UMD Women Studies Professor Beth Bartlett sat down with former Women's Music Show host Sally Larson to talk about her book "Making Waves: Grassroots Feminism in Duluth and Superior."

"The Women's Music Show: women's voices and women's song" is a long running community-hosted program on KUMD every Sunday 1-5pm.