February

Larry Weber returns from his peregrinations with a look into the future at The Spring To Come ... and marvels at February: it's only the second time in 40 years that it's been the snowiest month!

Paul Downey/Flickr

Larry Weber says, until now, only once in his forty years of keeping records has there been more snow in February than January.

After this weekend ... make that twice.

Birch Trees
Joshua Mayer Flickr

With clear skies and sunlight this February, birch trees are creating tree wells, or tree circles, as Larry Weber calls them. Find out what else is in store the rest of February and join Larry tracking this Sunday, weather permitting of course. 

©Lisa Johnson

Today marks the 12th straight day of below-zero temperatures and 40 days of them so far this winter.

Despite that, the low angle of the sun means we have wrap-around sunrises and -sets, we're up to ten hours of daylight, and Larry Weber is leading a Critter Walk as part of the Sam-Zim Birding Festival!

©NOAA

A lot of folks still remember where they were on the February 2 in 1996 when Tower hit a record -60 below zero and Duluth recorded -39.

But do you remember where you were a week later when the temp jumped 84 degrees?

stuart anthony/Flickr

Way back in 1996, Minnesota recorded the coldest temperature ever when Tower hit -60 on February 2.

Duluth checked in with a half-hearted -30 that day, but Larry Weber reminds us that five days later, we hit 45 degrees.

Oh, and if you're hoping for snow days this month, chances are you're out of luck.

imgflip.com

Snow today ... sunshine tomorrow ... and thunderstorms Monday and Tuesday.  Larry Weber on March in the Northland.

born1945 [via Flickr (modified)]

  The unseasonably warm few days we've had are in stark contrast to last week's 4-day stretch with sub-zero temps reported.  Though it did not get below freezing last night in many places in the region, Larry Weber points out that we are still a month away from the vernal equinox.  Hence, he has coined the term "pseudo-spring" for this unusual turn of events.

Snowshoe hares and squirrels are dancing; foxes, wolves and coyotes are singing ... and as always, Larry Weber is the head cheerleader.