Environment & Outdoors

Corey Templeton/Flickr

Amy and Dave Freeman are not like a lot of couples.

For one thing, they just came back from a year spent living in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness for a year - basically just the two of them and their sled dogs.  While many couples would find that much togetherness ringing a death knell for them, Amy says their relationship "is better when we're in the woods."

In fact, its an experience the wilderness educators and travelers say everyone should try - at least, for a few nights.

©Lisa Johnson

Master gardener Tom Kasper is excited about all the new fruit trees folks are planting to replace trees downed in summer storms.

But the problem is, rabbits, mice and deer are excited about them, too.

Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 2, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Larry says we had the third warmest September on record ... and that's good news for late season wildflowers like the New England Aster.

Lisa Johnson

Outdoorspeople, in particular, decry our modern dependence on technology and electronics.

Dr. Marcos Algara-Siller doesn't mess around.

He's an environmental engineer at the Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi in Mexico, and he's teaching a class on sustainability communication for environmental scientists - from Mexico - with Dr. David Syring of UMD's Anthropology department.

Lake Superior charter fishing is alive and well in Duluth in fact charter fishing here has a history dating back to 1909. If you are on a 32 foot Marinette charter fishing boat out of the Duluth Harbor, chances are that Peter Dahl’s your captain and John Meining is your deckhand. This week Sea Grant Files host Jesse Schomberg talks about the charter fishing on Lake Superior and “the catch of the day”. Sea Grant Files airs on KUMD alternate Tuesdays at 8:20 on Northland Morning. Check the audio and links below for more Sea Grant Files and the research of Minnesota Sea Grant.

Brenda Dobbs/Flickr

A thousand hawks migrating over Hawk Ridge, the leaves changing color - those are signs of the season that are easy to see.  But Larry Weber says if you're paying attention, you can find things like eyelash fungus on downed logs and something called pinwheel fungus that he's seen sprout out of a single pine needle!

Kate Brady/Flickr

The aquarium needs cleaning and the kids have lost interest in the fish.  Or the frogs. Or the gecko. 

But flushing or dumping everything outside is a bad idea for two reasons:  one, it's inhumane for the animals and two, it's a really bad idea for the environment.

The same hardiness that makes milfoil and goldfish such great aquarium dwellers means they also excel as  invasive species. 

Lisa Johnson

Master Gardener Tom Kasper says now is the time to divide perennials - like peonies - and maybe even organize a swap with your friends.

In Larry's last report of the summer (next Thursday marks the equinox and the start of fall), he talks about the warmer- and wetter-than-average weather, glow worms, "beard fungus" and the joys of Hawk Ridge.

 

Minnesota Sea Grant kicks off a new season on Northland Morning with a look back at work from the summer.  The Minnesota Sea Grant summer intern Claire Freesmeier joins host Jesse Schomberg to share her work identifying our next potential invasive species threats like the golden mussel, Asian carp and others that lurk in the Great Lakes' future.

Catch The Sea Grant Files every other Tuesday at 8:20am on Northland Morning.

The Sea Grant Files

Paul VerDerWerf [via Flickr]

After an abundance of rain in recent days, naturalist Larry Weber says the weekend should be a fine time to get out and find mushrooms.  Late summer and early fall brings the beginning of fall colors, and many birds are starting to take wing, including hawks, flickers, blue jays, thrushes and turkeys. Even as temps start to turn cooler, many insects are still abundant, including green darner dragonflies, bees and butterflies. Larry has been hearing spring peepers and gray tree frogs in the woods, and the other day witnessed a new baby snapping turtle searching for the water.

Leading up to this Saturday's Lake Superior Harvest Festival at Bayfront Festival Park, we continue our KUMD Sustainability Week series talking with Jessica Fritsch of the Sierra Club, who will be one of the organizations at the festival this weekend.  The Sierra Club is one of the oldest environmental preservation organizations in the U.S., formed in the 1890s by renowned preservationist John Muir.

  

    Leading up to this Saturday's Lake Superior Harvest Festival at Bayfront Park, we continue our KUMD Sustainability Week series with a conversation with Sarah Lerohl, Environmental Program Coordinator at the Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (WLSSD) and we are talking about composting, and non-toxic homecare practices.

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