Environment & Outdoors

Tom O'Rourke

Hartley Nature Center is closed for the remainder of this week, after straight line winds in excess of 70 mph caused "trees down everywhere" in the park, blocking trails, damaging the nature playscape and the yurt and leaving Hartley still without power almost a week later.  It's a possibly hazardous - and definitely expensive situation as Hartley staff and the city continue to assess the damage and decide what happens next.

Lisa Johnson

Every year, master gardener Tom Kasper carefully tips the roses at the Rose Garden to protect them through the winter.

But trees aren't rosebushes, and trying to tip storm-uprooted silver maples and spruces back into place is a recipe for disaster.

Also: when it comes time to replant trees, Tom has some ideas for replacements with sturdy root systems.

Doug Kerr [via Flickr]

  KUMD taks with Brad Parsons, the Central Regional Fisheries Manager for the Minnesota DNR, about the DNR proposal to build a new fisheries facility at Mille Lacs Lake that would include a fisheries management station, fish hatchery and storage. The DNR would be able to more efficiently meet its Mille Lacs management goals and outreach needs with the new facility.

©Christopher Harwood

"And when you smile for the camera
I know I'll love you better...."

~ Peg, written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen

Larry Weber says recent rains have resulted in a wealth of "photogenic mushrooms," wildflowers are everywhere you look (learn more about the story behind the name of Joe-Pye weeds here) and everything from scarlet tanagers to summer frogs to the full moon are out to catch your eyes and ears.

Spending the day at the beach? Catch the Park Point Beach Report every weekday at 11 am on KUMD as we bring you the latest beach conditions from water temperature to rip current risk. Park Point Beach Report is brought to you by KUMD and the Minnesota Sea Grant. Have a safe and happy summer. 

The Park Point Beach Report will run through Friday, September 2.

Mandy Uhrich

When it comes to fishing, let's face it: many men just take it way too seriously.  (Remember the grumpy dads who made you sit in absolute silence for hours?)

How can women learn to fish if they don't want to have it "mansplained" to them?

Simple: the Minnesota DNR has the oldest - and largest (with 130 different programs) in its BOLD (Becoming an Outdoors Woman) program.

Tom Kasper is pretty excited about some of the new easy care roses, including the two pictured here: The Winnipeg Parks rose and the Como Park rose.

Back in 1936 over a ten day period in July, Duluth set seven record high temperatures that still stand - including 106 on July 13.

And that was back in the days when they took the temperature readings down by the lake.

Uff-da.

Brent Reimnitz/Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

Back in 1966, Twin Metals Minnesota was granted a pair of federal mineral leases, one of which includes land within a quarter mile of the Boundary Waters Wilderness.

They're up for renewal now, and the US Forest Service wants to hear from the public before they make a recommendation. 

Bird eggs hatching
Lisa Johnson

Fireflies are out, so are baby mammals, insects, and the things that eat insects.

And Larry Weber says July is the month of fledglings.

Post Foods

Folks of a certain age remember snickering over Euell Gibbons' TV commercials for cereal in the early '70s, but the celebrated forager and author of numerous books on edible wild plants was on to something.

National Weather Service

Rip currents claim more lives on the Great Lakes every year than tornados, lightning or floods.  That's according to the UW-Madison professor who's installed an underwater wave pressure sensor along Park Point beach to help detect the deadly currents. 

For more information on rip currents, you can check out the National Weather Service's Rip Currents Safety Page

Bill Dickinson/Flickr

You know how, a couple of times a year, school (sometimes the whole city) shuts down and everyone is told to stay home for a snow day?

Tom Kasper, a regular feature host on Northland Morning (called "an epicenter of social change") says he could absolutely get behind the idea of everything shutting down and being told to stay home on a sunny, 75 degree day - to garden.

© Windslash (via flickr)

Last-minute spring rainstorms ushered in our first week of summer.  Animals are busy: fireflies are out, some breeding birds are beginning their second brood, particularly robins and phoebes. Gray tree fogs are still making noise, and summer will also bring the calls of mink frogs and green frogs.  Turtles, butterflies and some cicadas are emerging as well.

J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Larry Weber joins us from northeastern Nebraska this morning.  500 miles south of Duluth,  the berries that are just blooming here are ripe there.  In other words ... Larry is joining us from summer.

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