Environment & Outdoors

©Lisa Johnson

Over thirty years and 125,000 miles behind a sled later, when John Stetson talks about training dogs, he comes back, over and over again, to trust. How it can enable a person to control 14 fast-moving dogs with only a brake and their voice.  And how easy it is to lose.  

There are no prima donnas on John Stetson’s dog teams.  That goes for the dogs and the human mushers he trains.

"The Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon is all about dogs," you say.  "So of course my dog is welcome, right?"

Beargrease organizers say please, leave your pet at home.

Two words: disease and dessert.

There are thousands of dollars and days invested in creating a competitive sled dog team, an investment that could be down the tubes if a sled dog picks up a bug from an unvaccinated or sick pet.

Patti Petersen/Flickr

Larry Weber says, once in a blue moon (like the one January 31), you should get out for a nice moonlight walk or ski or snowshoe tromp.

©Lisa Johnson

With temperatures in the 40s forecast for Friday, this might be the perfect time to wrap the trees, bushes and other plantings you want to protect from woodland marauders.

MaryRN

This week on The Sea Grant Files, host Jesse Schomberg brings us insight and information about the transportation of crude oil in and around the Great Lakes region.

©Catherine Winter. Used with permission

"January can give us interesting days," remarks Larry Weber, dryly.  We set a record low of -33 January 18 in 1994, and a year ago at this time, we had temperatures in the mid-40s.

brando/Flickr

Duluth's infamously old housing stock combined with the recent spate of below-zero temperatures has prompted many folks to take a second look at weather-proofing ... and Ecolibrium3 in Duluth is one of the places that can help you do just that.

Larry Weber joins us to talk about the winter issues that fascinate him, including something called "albedo." We also hear about how the January thaw affects the wildlife we see this time of year and how you can tell it's coyote mating season.

The ice ain't nice

Jan 12, 2018
Apostle Island National Lakeshore

There are a lot of things that are bad even though you can't tell by looking at them.

People, for example.  Novels. And ice. 

For example, the ice surrounding the mainland ice caves at the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is abysmal.

In fact, it's so  irredeemably bad the only hope for opening the ice caves this year (they last opened in 2015)  is if a northeasterly wind blows it all out "to sea"?  "to lake"?  and new ice can form.

Bad ice is dangerous ice.  

Andreas/Flickr

Seed catalogs as wish books - and then mulch, flamethrowers as weed control and the many varieties of kohlrabi as we celebrate the Vegetable of the Year and 2018 itself.

Sharon Mollerus [via Flickr]

It has been so cold these past few weeks, it's enough to make one think that everything in nature has burrowed down deep for a long sleep. But if there is anyone in our community who can remind us to look around to see that is not the case, it is educator, author and naturalist Larry Weber, and he joins us every Friday for Backyard Almanac.

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