Environment & Outdoors

Shawna Weaver

When we heard on Earthwise Radio this week that communing with nature makes us feel better, it probably wasn't a surprise.

But the why might surprise you.  Who woulda thunk that it's the structured, predictable nature of, well, nature that appeals to us?

Guy Sander (used with permission)

Larry Weber says the 2 1/2 inches of rain at his place this week means things are greening almost visibly.

Fiddlehead ferns that were just poking their heads from the soil last week are knee-high now, and if you have the time and patience, you'll be rewarded with good views of warblers.

In addition, Larry says he heard a visitor he hasn't heard at his place in over 20 years.

Timothy Crawshaw/Flickr

The League of Women Voters wants to get folks excited about Arbor Day again, so they're throwing a free public event May 20, featuring guest speaker Louise Levy.

The Lorax is rumored to be making an appearance also.

cool.as.a.cucumber/Flickr

There are a couple of big plant sale events coming up in the Northland, but given the weather recently, it's a great relief to know you won't have to camp overnight in line to get plants.

Show up at 4:00 am, maybe, but not camp overnight! 

Jack Pearce [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about these mid-May mornings that are "beyond description" with so much happening as nature awakes.  Also, because leaves have not fully grown out yet, it is a greater opportunity to see both flora in fauna as you explore the woods of northern Minnesota.

Kodey Weiss

This week, we’re featuring some entries in the Audio Story Challenge at UMD.

Here’s how it works.

  • Journalism students had to tell a story in two to three-and-a-half minutes.
  • The story has to include the sound of air or water
  • it has to include a mention of food
  • it has to include the voices of two people whose ages are at least 20 years apart.
  • it has to be a true story.

UMD Journalism major Kodey Weiss is no longer on academic probation.

Paige Oswald

This week, we’re featuring some entries in the Audio Story Challenge at UMD.

Here’s how it works.

©Lisa Johnson

Whether you want to hunt them or gawk at them, wild turkeys are moving north, expanding from their traditional range in southern Minnesota.

Smart, adaptable and with a wide variety of foods they like, wild turkeys are heading north all on their own.  And that's got hunters and bird watchers alike excited.

This week's warmup has spring things bustin' out all over, from frogs calling to dragonfly and spider web sightings, to new migrants, spring wildflowers and white pelicans hanging out on the St. Louis River before they head north.

Raptor Education Group, Inc., Antigo, WI

HF 888 is headed to conference committee in the House of Representatives. A provision in the bill would prohibit the DNR from adopting rules that restrict the use of lead ammunition.

The "collateral damage" of lead shot has long been a topic of concern for KUMD's Laura Erickson, who joined us this morning to talk about it.

Alan Weir/Flickr

If winter storm warnings on May Day weren't bad enough ... the weather was still lousy for World Naked Gardening Day.

And yes, that's a thing.  You can look it up.

Lisa Johnson

April is unpredictable, says Larry Weber.  It went along predictably enough, lulling us into a false sense of security and then, predictably, it became ... unpredictable.

Bob McCloughan of Bearskin Lodge /Visit Cook County

There's a long tradition of neighbors helping neighbors in the wild areas of northern Minnesota ... so when a neighbor fell through the ice into Hungry Jack Lake, other neighbors moblized to help.

We're finally caught up on moisture for the month; yes, snow in April is "normal;" we'll have 14 hours of daylight come Sunday and the white pelicans have returned to the St. Louis River.

Ginger Juel may be a UMD alumna, but she's still pretty passionate about what goes on on campus.

She's like to see the U jettison the use of herbicides - even the current practice of "targeted application" - altogether.

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