Environment & Outdoors

Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature is a summer series on KUMD bringing you voices of leadership in the fight for a sustainable planet. This episode illustrates Cosmomimicry with words from David McConville of the Buckminster Fuller Institute reminding us that is is all a matter of perspective. “If success or failure of this planet and of human beings depended on how I am and what I do, then how would I be and what would I do?” asked visionary designer Buckminster Fuller.  

GoToVan/Flickr

In honor of the U.S. women's soccer team's 2015 World Cup title, Carol Andrews presents, for our consideration: the cup plant.

Sandy Roggenkamp

Author and naturalist Larry Weber wraps up out June weather (a little bit warmer and drier than usual) and trots out some plain brown butterflies with exotic and lovely names: Little Wood-Satyr, Ringlet and Northern Pearly-eye. 

And in other news, the elusive Larry Weber was captured on camera, working on a survey of the Sax-Zim Bog!

Lake Superior is truly the greatest of the Great Lakes, especially where water quality is concerned.  And some Park Point beaches have even earned the title "Superstar Beach" for their cleanliness.

But sometimes, as Cindy Hakala from the Minnesota Department of Health advises, the bacteria count in the water at a beach goes up .... and that's partly because its cause rolls down hill.

You can find information on bacteria advisories, and a host of other useful information about Park Point beaches here.

Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature is on Monday nights at 7pm over the summer. This week Bioneers welcomes clean energy entrepreneur Billy Parish, founder of Mosaic, and banker Marco Krapels, co-founder of The Solutions Project.  They say we need clean energy democratization now and investment urgent and critical.  

Listen

This spring's warm temperatures and occasional rains have made for perfect growing conditions ... but if you want to take a break from your own garden, there are a couple of garden tours you might be interested in.  There's more information about the Duluth Garden Flower Society's Secret Garden Tour here and the Duluth Community Garden Program's Tasteful Garden Tour here.

KUMD presents Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature, a summer series.  Women are leading change in caring for the environment and bringing forward the stories of people around the world. Osprey Orielle-Lake, Leila Salazar and Lynne Twist tell the stories of women leading the clean energy revolution in Africa, defending the Amazonian rainforest, and making peace in Liberia.  Women making a difference for all people on earth.

Tom Tetzner/Flickr

After a year underwater, the frog eggs of last summer have matured to tadpoles and beyond.  Author and naturalist Larry Weber says finally,  the Frogs of Summer are all grown up.

David Everett started out as an environmentalist.  Then he became an artist.  Then he started creating sea monsters, "trash fish" out of things he picked up on the beach.  And now, he's not only doing an iron pour demonstration at the Park Point Art Fair this weekend, he's sharing his love of nature and of art with his special education students at the Wrenshall School.

6/23 North Shore

Jun 23, 2015

Whether it's giving them a mud puddle to play in or a frog to follow, the education staff at Hartley Nature Center is getting kids outside. The Center offers everything from preschool and early-childhood programs to school field trips and summer day camps.   Tiffany Smith is Hartley's education director, and she explains how she knows when they get it right.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM/Flickr

Native plant enthusiast Carol Andrews says "know before you grow."  For instance, before you help yourself to a cluster of lupines from a roadside ditch and transplant them into your backyard, you might want to know they're not native to Minnesota - and in addition, they're poisonous! 

Vicki DeLoach/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says the big insect news this week is dragonflies, including a huge emergence of calico pennants.

Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute

Wisconsin has almost doubled its loon population in the last thirty years.  It's good news, not only for those who love the haunting call of these bird, but because loons need clean, clear, healthy lakes in which to live and raise their families.

Now LoonWatch is looking for volunteers/citizen-scientists to help them collect loon population data.  LoonWatch coordinator Erica LeMoine explains.

Seven tons of pollutants are no longer in Minnesota's atmosphere.

Put another way, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's (MPCA) partnership with small businesses has taken the equivalent of 13-thousand cans of spray paint out of the air.

And they've even helped pay for the retooling, distributing about $500,000 dollars in grants from the 2014 Minnesota legislature.

Eric David has the details.

Master gardener Tom Kasper talks about how to figure out what's going on when you notice something is amiss with a plant or tree or shrub in your garden ... and how to get help fixing it.  Plus the Duluth Garden Flower Society's 20th Annual Secret Garden Tour is next month!

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