Environment & Outdoors

Evan Long/Flickr

"Don't change the height of the mower dramatically!"

"Don't cut below 2 1/2 inches!"

"I'm busy crowding out other weeds; leave me alone!"

Master gardener Tom Kasper says listen to your lawn: it might surprise you.

Chris Evans [via flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber say this period just prior to the summer solstice gives us the earliest sunrises of the year, even though not yet the longest days.  In this first week of June, the rainfall total so far this month is lower than normal.  We are now near the end of bird migration.  Many blooming flowers, including lilacs, are in fine form this week as well.

WIldwoods Rehabilitation

How could anyone with a heart resist an "abandoned" fawn or a baby bird flopping helplessly on the ground?

The compassion isn't the problem at this time of year; the problem is what you don't know you don't know in order to really help.

Luckily for us, Wildwoods is there - on the phone or online - to help.

jimflix!/Flickr

For the first time in over a year, a month averaged cooler than normal temperatures.

As May splashed  off in its yellow rain boots, June burst on the scene yesterday with a high temperature of 79: perfect for enjoying apple blossoms, baby birds, frog calls and mostly mosquito-free conditions.

Copyright Wolf Ridge ELC. Used with permission.

The ribbon-cutting and ground-breaking ceremony this weekend for Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center's dormitory renovations and the new staff space isn't the real story; the real story is the first Living Building in Minnesota, a project the executive director says is inspirational ... and groundbreaking.

Lisa Johnson

You can even sing today's forecast if you want to: The sun'll come out ... tomorrow ...

So if you're ready to take advantage of a little sunshine and some warm temperatures for a change, Tom Kasper says maybe one of the many classes this spring on bee-friendly gardening has inspired you.

You can do everything from giving over your whole yard to pollinator-friendly plants or just do one thing: remember, when you buy plants, to make sure they have NOT been exposed to neonicotinoids.

For the first time in over a year, we have a month - May - where the temperature was cooler than normal.

But if anyone can find the silver lining in a cool, wet May, it would be Larry Weber.

Shawna Weaver

When we heard on Earthwise Radio this week that communing with nature makes us feel better, it probably wasn't a surprise.

But the why might surprise you.  Who woulda thunk that it's the structured, predictable nature of, well, nature that appeals to us?

Guy Sander (used with permission)

Larry Weber says the 2 1/2 inches of rain at his place this week means things are greening almost visibly.

Fiddlehead ferns that were just poking their heads from the soil last week are knee-high now, and if you have the time and patience, you'll be rewarded with good views of warblers.

In addition, Larry says he heard a visitor he hasn't heard at his place in over 20 years.

Timothy Crawshaw/Flickr

The League of Women Voters wants to get folks excited about Arbor Day again, so they're throwing a free public event May 20, featuring guest speaker Louise Levy.

The Lorax is rumored to be making an appearance also.

cool.as.a.cucumber/Flickr

There are a couple of big plant sale events coming up in the Northland, but given the weather recently, it's a great relief to know you won't have to camp overnight in line to get plants.

Show up at 4:00 am, maybe, but not camp overnight! 

Jack Pearce [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber talks about these mid-May mornings that are "beyond description" with so much happening as nature awakes.  Also, because leaves have not fully grown out yet, it is a greater opportunity to see both flora in fauna as you explore the woods of northern Minnesota.

Kodey Weiss

This week, we’re featuring some entries in the Audio Story Challenge at UMD.

Here’s how it works.

  • Journalism students had to tell a story in two to three-and-a-half minutes.
  • The story has to include the sound of air or water
  • it has to include a mention of food
  • it has to include the voices of two people whose ages are at least 20 years apart.
  • it has to be a true story.

UMD Journalism major Kodey Weiss is no longer on academic probation.

Paige Oswald

This week, we’re featuring some entries in the Audio Story Challenge at UMD.

Here’s how it works.

©Lisa Johnson

Whether you want to hunt them or gawk at them, wild turkeys are moving north, expanding from their traditional range in southern Minnesota.

Smart, adaptable and with a wide variety of foods they like, wild turkeys are heading north all on their own.  And that's got hunters and bird watchers alike excited.

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