Environment & Outdoors

David Everett started out as an environmentalist.  Then he became an artist.  Then he started creating sea monsters, "trash fish" out of things he picked up on the beach.  And now, he's not only doing an iron pour demonstration at the Park Point Art Fair this weekend, he's sharing his love of nature and of art with his special education students at the Wrenshall School.

6/23 North Shore

Jun 23, 2015

Whether it's giving them a mud puddle to play in or a frog to follow, the education staff at Hartley Nature Center is getting kids outside. The Center offers everything from preschool and early-childhood programs to school field trips and summer day camps.   Tiffany Smith is Hartley's education director, and she explains how she knows when they get it right.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM/Flickr

Native plant enthusiast Carol Andrews says "know before you grow."  For instance, before you help yourself to a cluster of lupines from a roadside ditch and transplant them into your backyard, you might want to know they're not native to Minnesota - and in addition, they're poisonous! 

Vicki DeLoach/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says the big insect news this week is dragonflies, including a huge emergence of calico pennants.

Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute

Wisconsin has almost doubled its loon population in the last thirty years.  It's good news, not only for those who love the haunting call of these bird, but because loons need clean, clear, healthy lakes in which to live and raise their families.

Now LoonWatch is looking for volunteers/citizen-scientists to help them collect loon population data.  LoonWatch coordinator Erica LeMoine explains.

Seven tons of pollutants are no longer in Minnesota's atmosphere.

Put another way, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's (MPCA) partnership with small businesses has taken the equivalent of 13-thousand cans of spray paint out of the air.

And they've even helped pay for the retooling, distributing about $500,000 dollars in grants from the 2014 Minnesota legislature.

Eric David has the details.

Master gardener Tom Kasper talks about how to figure out what's going on when you notice something is amiss with a plant or tree or shrub in your garden ... and how to get help fixing it.  Plus the Duluth Garden Flower Society's 20th Annual Secret Garden Tour is next month!

Larry Weber, naturalist, educator and host of Backyard Almanac, tells us that June is typically "the lawn-mowing month" due to the increase in rain, sun, and temps that conspire to make the grass grow quickly. Orchids, ferns and mushrooms are also abundant.  The irises are emerging, baby birds and fireflies are too.  

 Kelly Wallin, head mechanic for the Bike Cave in Duluth, talks about how the Bike Cave creates access to bicycles for everyone.  Located at 1712 Jefferson Street, it is run completely by volunteers and functions on a skill-trade system. Those who wish to build a bicycle can trade parts, knowledge, volunteer hours or even food for the community as payment for a bicycle. 

 Tom O'Rourke, outdoor enthusiast and executive director of the Hartley Nature Center, talks about two North Shore reads for the summer, North Shore: A Natural History of Minnesota's Superior Coast by Chel Anderson and Adelheid Fischer, a colorful exploration of the natural history and ongoing factors that currently shape the region, and The Lighthouse Road: A Novel by Peter Geye set along the North Shore in the early twentieth century.

  Sitting in for Carol Andrews this week is John Pastor, who talks about juneberries, their variety, and their flowering and fruit ripening habits.

John Pastor is a UMD Professor of Biology and author of What Should a Clever Moose Eat?: Natural History, Ecology, and the North Woods, to be published in February 2016 by Island Press. 

 Bioneers: Revolution in the Heart of Nature is a special environmental series airing on KUMD all summer.  This week hear how building community and social movements can be a path to adaptation and resillience according to environmental activist Danny Glover and former CEO of Green For All  Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins. 

Listen

  

 All Summer KUMD is airing the voices of leadership on climate change.  Monday at 7 p.m. we bring you the special radio series Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature. In episode 1, Listen as Nalini Nadkarni shares her discoveries about the forest canopy, both scientific and inspirational.

 

Wildwoods Rehabilitation

If Laura Erickson has taught us anything over the last almost-thirty years, it's that animals think - and act - like animals, not humans.  So when we see the baby fawn all alone or the little bird out of it's nest, our human oh-my-gosh-it's-an-infant-alone-in-the-woods instinct kicks in and we rush to help.  

Chiot's Run/Flickr

Larry Weber's walks this week turned up more trees in bloom, blossoms of wild rose and honeysuckle, new June wildflowers away from the woods and out in the open ... and a baby porcupine, which he did not try to pick up!

Pages