Environment & Outdoors

Thorsburg Photography

Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory has been counting migrants on the ridge for two weeks already, the sun is setting before 8pm and reds and yellows are popping up in all kinds of trees and bushes.

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says goodbye to August and hello to autumn.

KUMD celebrates Sustainability Week on Northland Morning, August 31st through September 4th as the Official Radio Station of the upcoming the 22nd Annual Lake Superior Harvest Festival. The annual festival with an extensive farmers market happens Saturday September 12th at Duluth's Bayfront Park.  Listen each morning at 8 as we talk with folks about sustainability in our community, from local farmers to renewable energy .  KUMD's Sustainability Week is brought to you in part by Energy Plus of Duluth.

Caitlin Nielson

If you give him a minute, Jamie Harvie is the kind of person who can tell you how all kinds of disparate things are connected.

Take for example, the upcoming Accountable Communities conference, put together in part by Harvie's Institute for a Sustainable Future. There, you'll learn how a gathering ostensibly billed as a health conference connects personal, economic, social and environmental health as well.

Housing as health care?  Harvie says it's all a question of "putting things in right relationship."

The Tomato Man Project Facebook page

If school is about to start, that means harvest festivals can't be far behind.  Tom Kasper, president of the Duluth Garden Flower Society, is especially excited about an undertaking that is near and dear to his heart:  The Tomato Man Project.

Flickr/ Vicki DeLoach

Who is that happy bearded man sitting in a patch of goldenrod?

Chances are, it's author and naturalist Larry Weber.

(Oh, and don't get him started on goldenrod being blamed for the allergens of ragweed!)

Wisconsin DNR/Josh Mayer.

If you're a Wisconsin resident and you have a thought or two about the state's management of wildlife, fish and habitat - for game and non-game - the public comment period on two new plans is winding to a close.

David Patte/US Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr and Jason Hollinger/Flickr

Carol Andrews, president of the Wild Ones® Minnesota Arrowhead Chapter came back from a recent trip to Madeline Island with three things on her mind: first, that hemlocks are her favorite tree; second, that wintergreen is blooming and finally, that we need to teach kids that bugs aren't icky; they're our friends.

Biodiversity Heritage Library

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the heat, the Heat, and the HEAT. The days are getting shorter, so he has noticed the beginning of fall bird migration, including chimney swifts and nighthawks.  Gray tree frogs are calling, goldenrod and asters are in bloom, and the blackberries are ripe.  Not many mushrooms, unfortunately, even though we received some rain over the past week.

Hopes to put a factory farm (also called Concentrated Animal Feed Operations or CAFOs) in Bayfield County are being met with - among other protests - events like a recent "Stink-in" in Ashland.  What's the problem with 20-25 thousand hogs all in one place?  We talk with activist Frank Koehn about the environmental impact on the region, including the Lake Superior watershed.

Tom Kasper talks about activities many gardeners are anticipating the first frost, dividing their perennials, and preparing for fall harvest. 

Also, Tom reports that the Duluth Community Garden Program's "Tour of Tasteful Gardens" has been postponed until next summer.

Jared Smith

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the welcome rain (hopefully reviving the mushroom population), as well as the Perseids meteor shower, migrating birds, tree frogs, insects, wildflowers, and blackberries.  Larry also has noted that some leaves are beginning to show autumn color – the birches in particular are changing early, perhaps due to the dry weather.  

The Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S.

Carol Andrews, the president of the Wild Ones® Minnesota Arrowhead Chapter talks about the benefits of transforming unused areas of your traditional grass lawn into a place for natural grasses, shrubs, and other plants.  One useful tool in that process is the use of weed suppression mats (a wood pulp version of this product is even made locally) that allow water and air into the soil, but blocks sunlight which in turn hinders weed growth.

Mario Klingemann/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks spiderwebs, continues to defend goldenrod from its undeserved reputation as an allergen, and warns against eating baneberry: "it is a bit nasty."

Duluth Community Garden Program

Tom Kasper gives up tips on watering our gardens during the hotter summer days.  

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