Environment

©John Krumm

John Doberstein says he cringes when the conversation becomes "What's better?  Good mining jobs or tourism jobs paying minimum wage?"

In fact, the Duluth for Clean Water organizer has gone on the record more than once saying he rejects the ideas that it's "jobs v. the environment" or "the Iron Range v. the Cities."

Doberstein isn't afraid of tough conversations - he just wants them to start - and focus on - what brings people together, and one of those things, he believes, are good-paying jobs that allow people to live, work and raise families in the Northland.

St. Louis River Estuary

Diane Desotelle of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says it's a pretty good time to be a fish in the St. Louis River.

But it's going to get better. 

Through a network of unique partnerships and collaboration, the clean materials the US Army Corps of Engineers is dredging from ship channels in the harbor will be repurposed in the river to create better habitat for fish, including muskie, northern pike and walleye.

Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature is on Monday nights at 7pm over the summer. This week Bioneers welcomes clean energy entrepreneur Billy Parish, founder of Mosaic, and banker Marco Krapels, co-founder of The Solutions Project.  They say we need clean energy democratization now and investment urgent and critical.  

Listen

KUMD presents Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature, a summer series.  Women are leading change in caring for the environment and bringing forward the stories of people around the world. Osprey Orielle-Lake, Leila Salazar and Lynne Twist tell the stories of women leading the clean energy revolution in Africa, defending the Amazonian rainforest, and making peace in Liberia.  Women making a difference for all people on earth.

Professor Allen Mensinger / Department of Biology, Swenson College of Science and Engineering

It turns out silver carp really don't like the sound of outboard motors.

The invasive "flying fish," shown in so many online videos hurling itself out of the water and into the faces and boats of unsuspecting anglers, are leaping to escape the sound of boat motors.  And with that discovery comes what could be the key to keeping them away from the Great Lakes.

Brooke Vetter, the UMD graduate student in Integrated Biosciences who made the discovery, talks about how she found out and what her discovery could mean to stop the carp's northern expansion.