domestic violence

©Wica Agli

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell says, when it comes to the #metoo hashtag, for Native women it could be #metooX4.  Or X6.

He knows through his work at Mending the Sacred Hoop that Native women are more likely to suffer violence or sexual assault multiple times in their lives.

Fabiola Milla/Flickr

As recently as the 1970s, domestic abuse was seen as a private matter between a husband and wife.

If the police were called, it wasn't unheard of for them to just suggest the offender "take a walk around the block" and cool off.

From that societal climate, beginning in the 1980s, Duluth has become an international innovator in the way communities keep victims safe and hold perpetrators accountable.

Jane Fox/Flickr

You've been locked up for domestic violence.

You're released back to your community.

How do you become a part of that community again?

With people from the community helping you, in a Men As Peacemakers' program called Domestic Violence Restorative Circles.

"It's a very powerful process," says Amy Brooks, Victim Advocacy Coordinator, "but it's very moving."

Aftab Uzzaman/Flickr

Very few relationships are violent or abusive from the first date.

That's the insidiousness of domestic or dating violence: the gradual eroding of one person's sense of confidence, of self, of value, of reality ... and the gradual assumption of more and more power and control by the abuser.

But what if we could see the signs, the red flags before we (or someone we care about) is sucked into the vortex of an abusive relationship?

We can.  It's not easy, but we can.

Jeffrey/Flickr

What would it take to make you leave your home with nowhere to go?  For many women and families, it would take nothing less than violence.

1695 people* were helped by Safe Haven Shelter and Resource Center last year, many fleeing domestic abuse.

This week, KUMD takes a look at who is experiencing homelessness in the Northland. Who are they? Why don't they have homes? What are their options?

In this installment of our "Finding Home" series, Sarah Breyer of Safe Haven talks about women and children and where they can go -- short- and long-term -- when home isn't safe.

We honor Mary Asmus, Assistant City Attorney in the Duluth working for over 30 years as a prosecutor and community advocate, Mary is a leader in the fight against Domestic Violence.

Flickr/ Global Panorama

The videotape of Ray Rice punching his now-wife in the face and knocking her unconscious, the news that Adrian Peterson used a switch on his four year old son hard enough to leave marks, has brought the public consciousness back to the issue of domestic violence, accountability, why women stay and a host of other topics.

Topeka Library/Flickr

What makes a man batter a woman, and how are we contributing to the spread of domestic violence in the way we raise boys in this society?