Coyotes

Larry Weber joins us to talk about the winter issues that fascinate him, including something called "albedo." We also hear about how the January thaw affects the wildlife we see this time of year and how you can tell it's coyote mating season.

© Superior National Forest [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes the terrific autumnal conditions this morning, including aerial spider webs in the trees, bird migrations (robins, Canada geese, crows, flickers, warblers, et al.), young coyotes, newly-independent fawns, and butterflies.  Rainfall totals are the 13th highest on record (dating back to 18701), five inches above normal.  Wasps and hornets are gathering on goldenrod as they start to seek winter homes.  Late blooms include sunflowers, aster. Blackberries are still on hand, and the first phase of fall leaves are beginning to appear.

Bird eggs hatching
Lisa Johnson

Fireflies are out, so are baby mammals, insects, and the things that eat insects.

And Larry Weber says July is the month of fledglings.