Caring & Sharing

LSS Together for Youth

What pronouns to you prefer?

If you're a person of a certain age, you've probably never even considered that question.

And maybe that's part of the problem.

But there is a group in town that's serving as social support for young people who fall outside the "binary" classifications; young people who, as Kathy Hermes puts it, "dash from one safe space to the next," and they're offering us some of the best gifts of all if we can open our minds and hearts to receive them.

This interview originally aired on December 21, 2017.

Two Harbors Age to age/Facebook

The Northland Foundation's Rural Aging Initiative isn't just about helping folks stay in their homes longer.

If families are the building blocks of a community, it makes sense to provide them with support and connectedness to other families.

Duluth Community Garden Program

Maybe the ultimate goal would be a community garden every ten blocks all through the city of Duluth.

But in the meantime, the Duluth Community Garden Program contents itself overseeing 20 gardens, 255 rentable plots, providing resources for gardeners from shovels to canning lessons, and bringing the community together through food and gardening.

This interview originally aired on December 5, 2017.

Every year at this time KUMD brings you a special series called Caring and Sharing.  We interview people from local non-profit organizations that are making a difference in the Northland -- what they give TO the community and what they need FROM us during this holiday season.  Our guest this morning on the Caring and Sharing Holiday series is Mary Schmitz, the Development Director of CHUM in Duluth.

This interview originally aired on November 28, 2017

Chris M Morris [via Flickr, modified]

Our guest this morning on the Caring and Sharing Holiday series is John Doberstein with the North Star chapter of the Sierra Club.

YWCA GirlPower Duluth

300 girls in 10 different locations around Duluth are rocking GirlPower these days thanks to the YWCA ... and it's amazing how many ways there are to give back to the program and what a difference a mere $25 can make.

Life House

650 kids came through the doors of Life House this year.  More than half were homeless and for most of them, it wasn't the first time.  And in the 18 months or so since Life House opened Sol House for youth who've been sex trafficked, 12 kids have been sheltered there.

And the numbers keep adding up.  There are 140 kids on a waiting list for housing with nowhere to stay, and Life House has big dreams to be able to help them.

John M. Cropper/Flickr

The Northern Minnesota chapter of the American Red Cross was established in 1915 here in the Northland, and none other than Chester Congdon became the first vice chairman of the organization.  That's 101 years of accepting donations of blood and sweat, and drying tears.

Even so, Community Chapter Executive Dan Williams turns down a chance to ask for donations, preferring instead to make an impassioned plea for folks to make sure they have working smoke detectors.  And that means replacing units that are over ten years old, not just changing the batteries.

By some accounts, every day, 22 veterans of our armed forces take their own lives.

Mike Waldron was almost one of them.

Until he became - and created - the 23rd Veteran.


AICHO (American Indian Community Housing Organization) is looking after 175 people at the moment, providing culturally specific help for families and individuals struggling with domestic abuse, homelessness and poverty.

More and more people in the non-Native community are becoming familiar with AICHO, thanks to their exploding presence as a showcase for Native art and artists, and Daryl Olson, a domestic violence/sexual assault training specialist, says the community - Native and non-Native alike, can help the organization by getting involved through attending events and volunteerism.

When an accident or illness threatens the life of your child, it's your worst nightmare.

But when medical expenses, travel expenses, lodging expenses begin to mount up, too ... parents may feel the nightmare is just beginning.

That's where the Northern Lights Foundation steps in.