Birds

Animal Tracks in Snow
offthegridnews.com

Today Larry Weber talks about recent weather and "gray November" has proven to be true this month.

He also gives a list of Nothern birds he has seen around as well as animal tracks in the snow.   

     

WIldwoods Rehabilitation

How could anyone with a heart resist an "abandoned" fawn or a baby bird flopping helplessly on the ground?

The compassion isn't the problem at this time of year; the problem is what you don't know you don't know in order to really help.

Luckily for us, Wildwoods is there - on the phone or online - to help.

©Lisa Johnson

We're seeing the "effect" in "lake effect" this week ... but late season snows make it tough on birds and animals, returning migrants and winter-long residents.

Fyn Kynd Photography [via Flickr]

Larry Weber talks about the return of the cold temperatures - not really as unseasonable as people may think - as well as the return of many migrating birds, and other signs that, regardless of the cold snap, spring will be here soon.

©Bird Watching Daily

UMD's Dr. Gerald Niemi has seen a lot of changes in the St. Louis River since he began researching birds and their habitat there in the '70s.

Anita Ritenour

Author and naturalist Larry Weber observes the final week of summer, noting the warmer temps (10 degrees above average for September!).  The leaves are already starting to change: Maples, sumacs, dogwoods are turning red, but so are Virginia creeper and poison ivy. Yellow leaves to look out for are the ash, birch and poplar trees. Birds are migrating – this is "hawk weekend" in the Duluth area.  Geese and cranes are in motion, as are the warblers, thrushes and flickers, among others. 

nancybeetoo (via Flickr)

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber notes how the late summer rains have brought an abundance of mushrooms. Glowworms have been out and about.  The trees are starting to change color as fall moves in, and with fall comes the migration of birds – some say the greatest in recent memory.  Both raptors (hawks, eagles) and non-raptors (Canada geese, warblers and blue jays, et al.) have been sighted. Snakes too!

Biodiversity Heritage Library

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the heat, the Heat, and the HEAT. The days are getting shorter, so he has noticed the beginning of fall bird migration, including chimney swifts and nighthawks.  Gray tree frogs are calling, goldenrod and asters are in bloom, and the blackberries are ripe.  Not many mushrooms, unfortunately, even though we received some rain over the past week.

It took January, February, March and April to produce as much moisture as May has in two weeks.  Author, naturalist and educator Larry Weber tells us the difference it's making with the local flora and fauna.

4/16 Forever Home

Apr 16, 2015
Trish Hamme/Flickr

Animal Allies' Humane Educator Pat Castellano joins us to talk about keeping cats indoors.  It's not only safer and better for them ... it's safer and better for the birds.