Backyard Almanac

This week on Backyard Almanac, Larry Weber details the dramatic highs and lows from this past week with a nearly 50 degree swing.  He shares the surprising fact that snow fall so far this year is average and answers a listener question about why the trees didn't drop all their leaves in fall. Listen for details about who is moving about over the snow and of course details about the Annual Christmas bird count.

"Christmas in the Trenches, 1914," EyeWitness to History, www.eyewitnesstohistory.com

Larry Weber says, by his reckoning, winter officially started this week.

For one thing, the rivers froze.

For another, it was -17 yesterday morning.

And of course, it was time for his favorite holiday tune.  (You can hear it after Larry's piece below)

You can read more about Christmas in the Trenches here:

You can see a music video about the event, backed with John McCutcheon's song here:

December started off warmer than normal and a week ago, our snow was all gone.

Fast forward to today, and the snow is back plus we have temperatures below zero in the forecast for the first time this season.

Bernard Spragg. NZ/Flickr

Larry offers a wrap-up of our warmer-and-wetter-than-usual November, bids adieu to the snowpack for now, and welcomes the rain: "Every walk has been a fungal find!"

Lisa Johnson

We bid adieu to Aut-win, Larry's post-leaf-drop/pre-snow season ... and welcome the season of tracks.

Lisa Johnson

As a heavy, wet snow descends on the Northland, Larry says November snows frequently don't last.

But then, most Novembers don't average 47 degrees for a daytime high, either.

Sharon Mollerus/Flickr

Larry Weber says our temperatures so far in this month (the average is usually 32; so far our average is 50) are not normal.

Lisa Johnson

The Chicago Cubs weren't the only bears in the news this week -- as so often happens, there was a black bear in downtown Duluth getting a lot of press.

The warm temps and sunshine mean get out into the toolies and look at stuff this weekend, but Larry Weber says folks around his place are wearing blaze orange, just to be on the safe side -- even in their own yards!

Arturo Pardavila III /Flickr

Aut-win continues apace and with it, the dance of the crane flies and the appearance of the World Series moths.

Joe Lapp - Flickr

Larry Weber says it's tamarack time!!  He's also spotted ballooning baby spiders, "World Series" moths and shaggy-name mushrooms.

If those names confuse you, it's ok: you've just entered the season of Aut-Win.

Lisa Johnson

Phase one is the showy fall color of September trees.

Phase two is the yellow gold of the aspens at the beginning of October.

Last but not least: phase three.  The tamaracks show up everyone else with their show mid-October. 

Chrissine Cairns Rios/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 9, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Sneezeweed is still blooming in spots around the Northland.

Seriously.

Sneezeweed.

Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Larry Weber almost never takes a vacation ... so when he requested a little time off, we dug into the archives for this program from October 2, 2015.  Have a listen to find out what it was like last year at this time!

Larry says we had the third warmest September on record ... and that's good news for late season wildflowers like the New England Aster.

Brenda Dobbs/Flickr

A thousand hawks migrating over Hawk Ridge, the leaves changing color - those are signs of the season that are easy to see.  But Larry Weber says if you're paying attention, you can find things like eyelash fungus on downed logs and something called pinwheel fungus that he's seen sprout out of a single pine needle!

In Larry's last report of the summer (next Thursday marks the equinox and the start of fall), he talks about the warmer- and wetter-than-average weather, glow worms, "beard fungus" and the joys of Hawk Ridge.

 

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