Autumn

Bryan Garnett-Law/Flickr

Author and naturalist Larry Weber says with the coming of the autumnal equinox, living things start thinking ahead to how they will cope with the coming winter.

There are four methods: which one/s will you employ?

Anita Ritenour

Author and naturalist Larry Weber observes the final week of summer, noting the warmer temps (10 degrees above average for September!).  The leaves are already starting to change: Maples, sumacs, dogwoods are turning red, but so are Virginia creeper and poison ivy. Yellow leaves to look out for are the ash, birch and poplar trees. Birds are migrating – this is "hawk weekend" in the Duluth area.  Geese and cranes are in motion, as are the warblers, thrushes and flickers, among others. 

Jared Smith

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber talks about the welcome rain (hopefully reviving the mushroom population), as well as the Perseids meteor shower, migrating birds, tree frogs, insects, wildflowers, and blackberries.  Larry also has noted that some leaves are beginning to show autumn color – the birches in particular are changing early, perhaps due to the dry weather.