Northland Morning

Monday-Friday 6-9am

A mix of music to get you a great start on your day, plus fun features and interviews with a local perspective.

Weekly Schedule
6:08am | (M—F) 90 Second Naturalist
6:32am | Stardate
7:00am | (M) Minnesota Native News; (T—F) MN 90
7:08am | Earth Wise
7:32am | For the Birds with Laura Erickson
7:45am | (Th) Forever Home; (F) Radio Gallery
8:00am | Community Interviews; (F) Radio Theatre
8:20am | KUMD Features
>>(M) Where's Art?
>>(T) Tips for Hardy Gardeners | The Sea Grant Files
>>(W) Green Visions
>>(Th) MN Reads
>>(F) Backyard Almanac
8:40am | National Native News

When canoe enthusiasts Mark Neuzil and Norman Sims set out to write the first book on the history of canoes in the entire North American continent, their goal was to find the best illustrations they could.

To that end, they commissioned two oil paintings and a series of maps from a Minnesota cartographer to create a book that, more than anything, seems to be about memories.

Perspektivet Museum/Flickr

Marlene Wisuri of the Sami Cultural Center of North America provides some context for an interesting evening about reindeer herding, this week at UMD. 

amy/Flickr

It's a common enough trope in romantic comedies: one partner's fondness for foreign films with subtitles is often the dealbreaker.

Far from being elitist or boring, the criteria for the 2nd annual international film series, Building Bridges, was to find movies to show the audience "a piece of the world that would fascinate them."

The Duluth Bethel

If you work with "vulnerable" people in Minnesota - that is, anyone  susceptible to abuse, neglect or financial exploitation, the state will do a background check on you.

Two years ago, the state gave nursing homes, long term care facilities and substance abuse treatment centers until the end of this month to implement a tighter, better process, including a picture ID and electronic fingerprinting to help screen out job applicants with criminal records.

Tweed Museum of Art

Annie Dugan, curator and executive director of the Duluth Art Institute, says the Tweed Museum of Arts weekly senior exhibitions are more than final projects: they're a look at what new young artists are thinking and creating about.

©Nicole Modeen/The Duluth Playhouse Childen's Theatre

If you're hoping to get in to see the Duluth Playhouse's production of Disney's The Lion King JR., well, Duluth has sold out shows just like the Big Cities ... and rush lines (or lists), too.

Barbara Friedman/Flickr

Just when you think you've had it with the gray, sleety weather, Larry Weber reminds us of crocuses and vernal ponds.

Bea Ojakangas has written a lot of cookbooks over the years ... and delivered a lot of talks about it.

In fact, one of those talks, called "Cooking Up A Book," prompted the University of Minnesota Press to ask for this new book: a memoir (with recipes).

Forever Home 3/23

Mar 23, 2017

Moose | Animal Allies

Moose is an orange and white Domestic Longhair who is 6 years old. He came to us from a previous home and is now looking for his new loving home! Moose and Blackie are a solid pair. Where they go one, they go all. Moose is a timid, gentle fellow who desires a low key place to call home. 

Lily | Animal Allies

©Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

It's mud season.

Which has Minnesotans thinking about spring which has them thinking about summer which has them thinking about being outside.

This year, the Minnesota State Parks and Trails unveil a new park, a new bison, and a variety of times and places to get yourself seriously sticky.

©John Krumm

John Doberstein says he cringes when the conversation becomes "What's better?  Good mining jobs or tourism jobs paying minimum wage?"

In fact, the Duluth for Clean Water organizer has gone on the record more than once saying he rejects the ideas that it's "jobs v. the environment" or "the Iron Range v. the Cities."

Doberstein isn't afraid of tough conversations - he just wants them to start - and focus on - what brings people together, and one of those things, he believes, are good-paying jobs that allow people to live, work and raise families in the Northland.

Tom Kasper

Those weird lights glowing at all hours in Tom Kasper's basement?

Grow lights, trying to give his onion seedlings the 60-70 degrees and the 14 hours of daylight they need to grow into fine, big, grown-up onions.

That's our story and we're sticking to it.

Michelle Riley/The HSUS

Tens of thousands of animal welfare documents were removed from the USDA's website at the beginning of February, and although some have been reposted, local and national animal welfare advocates continue to press the USDA to restore them.

The USDA maintains the records were removed in an ongoing effort to "balance the need for transparency with rules protecting individual privacy." 

The Animal Welfare Act oversees research labs, zoos, circuses and animal breeders: almost eight thousand facilities.

Tribal members of the Lower Sioux Indian Community were frustrated with the lack of cultural awareness when it came to their health care and by a "fragmented" system that made it hard to track native health concerns.

But they had hope that they could create better access to care by opening their own clinic ... and also create employment opportunities beyond casino jobs.

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